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Frank Reed Horton (17 Jul 1896 - 28 Aug 1966)


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#1 chAdzkie1925

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Posted 15 March 2010 - 08:24 PM

Frank Reed Horton (17 Jul 1896 - 28 Aug 1966)

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EARLY YEARS
. Frank Reed Horton was born  in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, (near Pittsburgh), on July 17, 1896. By the  time Frank was 13 years old his family had moved to Easton,  Pennsylvania. The year was 1910 and he was enrolled in preparatory  school studies at Lerchs Academy, situated in downtown Easton, just a  few blocks from Lafayette College. When the family moved to Norwalk,  Connecticut, Frank continued his prep school studies at Worcester  Academy in Worcester, Massachusetts. In the two years he attended  Worcester Academy he played football, basketball and baseball. He also  excelled in other school activities. He served as the Business Manager  of the academy's weekly paper, THE VIGORNIA, and excelled in debate. He  became a member of Sigma Zeta Kappa Debating Society. On June 7, 1913,  presenting his topic "The Man Without a Country" by Edward Everett  Hale, Frank won the annual Dexter Award and a $25 prize. In May 1914,  Frank was elected to serve as president of the debating society.
  
  In 1915 after leaving Worcester Academy Frank worked the next two years  during the day as a law clerk for Robert A. Fosdick, Esquire, in  Stamford, Connecticut; and at night he studied law extension courses  from LaSalle College in Chicago. In the fall of 1916, at the age of 20,  he enrolled at Boston University Law School, where his freshman courses  were criminal law, agency, torts, sales, contract and property.
  
  One of the more significant events in his life at this time was his  joining in Sigma Alpha Epsilon social fraternity on November 4, 1916.  It would be a few years later when, as a war veteran returning to  school, he would find himself on the Lafayette College campus and  residing at the SAE house. That would be the place where he would begin  Alpha Phi Omega.
  
  As with many young people, Frank's parents were major influences in his  life. Frank was close to his mother mainly because his father traveled  a lot in his professional life. But even so, his father continued to  wield heavy influence on Frank's law studies. Just as it would appear  that Frank would continue his pursuit of law, the world war in Europe  was felt in America. On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war  against Germany. The War Army Act, a selective draft of 1,000,000 men  ages 21 to 30, was passed by congress on May 1 S, 1917. Frank was 21.  World War I would change Frank's focus forever.
  
  MASONRY And The WAR YEARS. Although Horton's Masonry and war  related experiences are not really interrelated they were both  significant events occurring at the same time period. On June 18, 1918,  Frank entered the Blue Lodge, Scottish Rite Masonic order Western Star  #37 A.F.&A.M. in Norfolk, Connecticut. Several years later he would  expand his Masonic life while on naval duty in Kirkwall, Scotland.
  
  On June 21, 1918, Frank R. Horton enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve  Force at New London, Connecticut. He reported for training on July 22,  1918, in Newport, Rhode Island, as a Radio Electrician. He transferred  October 5, 1918, to the naval unit at Boston University for additional  studies. While there he achieved Chief Boatswain's Mate rating on  December 19, 1918. It should be noted that Germany signed the Armistice  effectively ending the war on November 1 1, 1918, yet many tasks for  the military, especially for the Navy, needed to be completed. With a  commitment to the Navy for almost two more years Frank continued to  improve himself, taking and passing competitive exams to become an  officer. In 1919 he entered Naval Offficers-Material Training School,  at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
  
  Frank Reed Horton was commissioned an Ensign on April 17,1919. He  immediately reported to the First Naval District in Boston for active  service on the USS Whippoorwill, a newly commissioned minesweeper. The  first duty assignment for the ship was to the North Sea to participate  in the detonation of 57,000 magnetic mines strung from Orkney Islands,  just north of Scotland, and due east to Stavanger, Norway. Frank would  serve as a Watch Offficer, Navigation Offficer, Signal Offficer and  Inspection Offficer while on sea duty.
  
  But it was Frank's previous legal training that drew him away from his  regular assignments and into special duties with the navy court martial  system involving young seamen. More than a few, who, facing dangers and  being away from home and lacking personal guidance, found themselves in  trouble with navy rules and regulations. The matter of strengthening  principles in young men would influence Frank forever. Here we see  another significant event that would allow him to readily accept the  principles of Scouting in his life as well as those of Rotary, Masonry  and other organizations.
  
  On August 8, 1919, at Kirkwall, Scotland, in the Orkney Islands, he  entered the Royal Arch Chapter #209 of the York Rite. He would later  receive Life Member Militia Templi Preceptory St. Magnus recognition on  April 23,1922, upon returning to the United States.
  
  The USS Whippoorwill returned March 1920 to Charleston, South Carolina,  with Frank obtaining his naval discharge June 23, 1920, in  Philadelphia. He would earn the World War I Victory Medal and the  Minesweeper Clasp. From 1920 to 1922 after leaving the Navy Frank  managed his father's 11-acre hog and chicken stock farm, known as  Stoneacre, in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. While in Carlisle he joined  Kiwanis and the Knights of Pythias.
  
  LAFAYETTE COLLEGE, SCOUTING, ALPHA PHI OMEGA. In the summer of  1922 Frank moved to Columbus, Ohio. This information was gleaned from  Masonic records showing his change from Norwalk, Connecticut to  affiliation in the East Gate Lodge #603 in Galena, a suburb of  Columbus, Ohio. In the ensuing years he received the 32nd degree Prince  of the Royal Secret (Scottish Rite) Masonic Order from the Ordo ab Chao  Supreme Council 33rd Jurisdiction at Grand East, in Boston,  Massachusetts. Masonic Orders were a continuing vital part of Frank  Reed Horton's life. Later Frank would resign from Valley of Scranton  Masonic Lodge, March 8, 1926, to enter the Valley of Allentown Masonic  Lodge on June 3, 1927, while still maintaining his ties to the Blue  Lodge at East Gate #603 in Ohio.
  
  In the fall of 1923 Frank enrolled at Lafayette College as a sophomore.  That year his course of studies included history, English, psychology,  ethics and religion. He was 27 years old. In November of 1923 Frank  attended the American Legion Armistice Ball held at the Easton armory,  where he met another naval veteran, 10 years his senior, Herbert George  Horton, who had served as a lieutenant on a destroyer. In sharing  military stories and discussing the events of the day Herb, then Easton  Area Council Scout Executive, told Frank about Scouting and launched  Frank on his first Scouting assignment as Deputy Scout Commissioner for  South Side District and as interim Scoutmaster for a Scout Troop. Later  Frank would state, "In the Scout Oath and Law, I found the standard I  had been seeking, a standard of manhood that would stand the test of  time, and it was worldwide for friendship, understanding and world  peace."
  
  The events of Frank Reed Horton's life throughout this time period, his  family life, religious faith, study of law, military experience,  membership in Masonry and newly found ideals of Scouting allowed him to  have the energy, conviction, dedication and vision to provide the  leadership necessary for the next stage. Frank Reed Horton had the  conviction, dedication and vision to lead a group of 14 fellow students  who worked creatively and diligently to lay the foundation and  structure our Fraternity Alpha Phi Omega.
  
  *Article was written by Paul M. H. Lienhardt, '51, Alpha Psi  Chapter, Lehigh University, Lehigh, Pennsylvania. (Copyright © 2001,  Alpha Phi Omega. All rights reserved.) Brother Lienhardt spent many  hours of research on the early life of our Founder, and has given us a  detailed view of Frank Reed Horton that might have remained hidden with  the passage of time. We have all read "The Story of the Founding,"  written by our Founder, in the Pledge Manual. Here is the rest of his  story. We are very gratefull for the dedicated work, zeal, and  determination that Brother Lienhardt has devoted to compile this  historical aspect on the early life of our Founder, Frank Reed Horton.
"Rest if you can, but don't you quit..
It's pain that colors love"

AΦΩ 1925  

#2 Buknoy

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 12:44 AM

I found this photo of Alpha (Lafayette) Chapter's charter.  What put a smile on my face was that this document shows us that Founder Frank Reed Horton authorized himself as one of the organizers of the chapter:

Posted Image

Just sharing a piece of your fraternity's history. :)
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#3 naraht

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 01:28 AM

View PostBuknoy, on 04 March 2011 - 12:44 AM, said:

I found this photo of Alpha (Lafayette) Chapter's charter.  
The best place to find this image is at
http://sites.lafayette.edu/aporecords/
along with a few other images including the first time Alpha Phi Omega was in the Lafayette Yearbook.

BTW, the book that Frank Reed Horton wrote is listed in the US Library of Congress at
http://catalog.loc.g...4&CNT=25&HIST=1

Randy




#4 Buknoy

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 02:03 AM

Hey!  Thanks for providing the links, Randy!  I'm a big sucker for old and meaningful frat stuff.
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#5 Buknoy

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 02:30 AM

Please allow me to post a copy of Frank Reed Horton's application form (from http://sites.lafayette.edu/aporecords/ courtesy of naraht):

Posted Image

I just found out that he was also a member of an organization called Kappa Phi Kappa.  Also note that he literally drew the Square and Compasses on the said form. :)
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#6 naraht

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 05:55 AM

One of the things that you have to remember about Frank Reed Horton is that although the founding talks about World War I service, it was after Germany surrendered. However the United States didn't sign the same peace treaty with Germany that the British and the French did. So service during 1919 in the North Sea is considered by the US Military to have been *during* World War I and Frank Reed Horton was a Wartime veteran.

His ship was the USS Whippoorwill (AM-35), it was Launched 4 July 1918, and commissioned 1 April 1919. For more information on the ship see http://en.wikipedia....oorwill_(AM-35) . For more specific information, see http://www.history.n...ppoorwill-i.htm . In fact, for the description in "The Story behind the founding": "When we reached ports some of the sailors ran wild. Many court martial cases resulted. " The port in question was almost certainly included Kirkwall, Orkney, Scotland (The Orkney Islands are off the north coast of Scotland)

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 11:47 AM

Dami namang frat nyan. Parang si the charge to, a.

#8 naraht

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 05:54 PM

Kappa Phi Kappa is an honor society in the field of Education. Most of its chapters have gone inactive.

#9 Buknoy

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 09:03 PM

@naraht - Yup, I just recently read about the fact that it is an honor society.  I seem to observe and distinguish the difference between a "social" fraternity from that of a "service" fraternity.  I am assuming that an individual can join one of each.  As in the case of Frank Reed Horton, he joined Sigma Alpha Epsilon as his social fraternity while founding Alpha Phi Omega as his service fraternity.

My questions, which is a bit off-topic, are:

1. Does this hold true even today?
2. Can someone join two or more social fraternities, or two or more service fraternities?

In the Philippines, as you may have already observed, there is no distinction between being 'social' and being 'service'.  There have been cases of multiple memberships in a collegiate/university fraternity and at the same time, a community-based group.
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#10 Buknoy

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 09:51 PM

View PostAdmin, on 04 March 2011 - 11:47 AM, said:

Dami namang frat nyan. Parang si the charge to, a.

Kakaiba si "the charge" tol.  Si "the charge" kasi, hindi pwede malaman ng ibang grupo niya na nag-miyembro na siya dun sa isa.  In due time pa daw.  Ahehehe
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#11 naraht

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 10:51 PM

View PostBuknoy, on 04 March 2011 - 09:03 PM, said:

@naraht - Yup, I just recently read about the fact that it is an honor society.  I seem to observe and distinguish the difference between a "social" fraternity from that of a "service" fraternity.  I am assuming that an individual can join one of each.  As in the case of Frank Reed Horton, he joined Sigma Alpha Epsilon as his social fraternity while founding Alpha Phi Omega as his service fraternity.

My questions, which is a bit off-topic, are:

1. Does this hold true even today?
2. Can someone join two or more social fraternities, or two or more service fraternities?

In the Philippines, as you may have already observed, there is no distinction between being 'social' and being 'service'.  There have been cases of multiple memberships in a collegiate/university fraternity and at the same time, a community-based group.

The rule in the United States (in some cases backed by the National level multi-fraternity councils) is that you can only join *one* social fraternity/sorority. There are also a *few* case (mostly in music) where you can't join more than one professional fraternity *in the same major".

However, it would be theoretically possible  for a man trying to become a Music Teacher to belong to
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Social Fraternity,
Alpha Phi Omega National Service Fraternity,
Gamma Sigma Sigma Service Sorority (yes they are a sorority, but per Title IX they have to take men),
Kappa Phi Kappa Educational Honor Society,
Delta Omicron professional music honors fraternity
and Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society.
(And square and compass)

Of these, Kappa Phi Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa use *entirely* objective criteria in determining membership. (Classes X, Y, and Z, GPA > value or top ABC% of the class). I'm not sure on Delta Omicron, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Alpha Phi Omega and Gamma Sigma Sigma vote. Sigma Alpha Epsilon is the only one that would have a student house that he would have the option of living in.

In my chapter at Carnegie-Mellon, we had a brother who pledged Sigma Nu Social Fraternity after he was initiated into Alpha Phi Omega and a woman brother who was Pledgemaster for Kappa Kappa Gamma Social Sorority for part of the same time that she was APO chapter president.

From what I understand, back in the 1940s and 1950s there was less restriction on joining more than one fraternity in the Philippines.

#12 Buknoy

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 11:20 PM

Ok, I get it.  So there is really a distinction between 'social' and 'service' frats.  In present time, I can become a member of one of each.  Thanks for your very informative respons, Randy.

Yup, back in the days there is really no restriction to memberships in these groups in the Philippines.  That's why we can read on profiles of great leaders of the country having the below credentials:

Upsilon Sigma Phi Fraternity
Beta Epsilon Fraternity of the College of Engineering
Vanguard Fraternity (ROTC)
Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society


These days, a student belonging to all these organizations would be a rarity if not none at all.
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Posted 05 March 2011 - 12:49 AM

View PostBuknoy, on 04 March 2011 - 09:51 PM, said:

Kakaiba si "the charge" tol.  Si "the charge" kasi, hindi pwede malaman ng ibang grupo niya na nag-miyembro na siya dun sa isa.  In due time pa daw.  Ahehehe

basta wag nyang sapawan ang last at ako na mismo magtatakwil sa kanya. nasa membership pa naman me. mwahaha.

#14 Buknoy

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 01:08 AM

OT: Ako ba pwede sumali din dun sa huli ni the charge?
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#15 naraht

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 02:11 AM

View PostBuknoy, on 04 March 2011 - 11:20 PM, said:

Ok, I get it.  So there is really a distinction between 'social' and 'service' frats.  In present time, I can become a member of one of each.  Thanks for your very informative respons, Randy.

Yup, back in the days there is really no restriction to memberships in these groups in the Philippines.  That's why we can read on profiles of great leaders of the country having the below credentials:

Upsilon Sigma Phi Fraternity
Beta Epsilon Fraternity of the College of Engineering
Vanguard Fraternity (ROTC)
Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society


These days, a student belonging to all these organizations would be a rarity if not none at all.

Actually, for Service Fraternities and Sororities there is no limit, there just isn't anything that quite fits into the same slot with Alpha Phi Omega. Alpha Phi Omega within the last 10 years joined the Professional Fraternity Association where most of the groups are for a specific academic field. 90% of the undergraduates don't know. :)

Which of the four groups these days would object to which others for joint membership?
(Phi Kappa Phi almost certainly doesn't care since they are bound by the rules of the International group which doesn't care)

Randy

#16 naraht

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 02:14 AM

For the Filipino part of the thread, is the idea to challange someone's membership jokingly by asking him a question based on the information I've given like "What was Frank Reed Horton's ship?"

#17 Buknoy

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 02:31 AM

View Postnaraht, on 05 March 2011 - 02:11 AM, said:


Which of the four groups these days would object to which others for joint membership?
(Phi Kappa Phi almost certainly doesn't care since they are bound by the rules of the International group which doesn't care)

Randy

Well, that leaves us only with Phi Kappa Phi as the group which wouldn't mind joint membership at all.  All others would.
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#18 IODEM

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 01:00 AM

well, the totality of AFO or APHIO is combination of wisdom learned by Mr. Frank Reed Horton from scouting ideals and principles, freemasonry and Sigma Alpha Epsilon and the likes of groups whom he was a member....

the APHIO seal, the formation of three inverted triangles is similar to the emblem for the Intimate Secretary as 6th degree of Structure of Freemasonry.
Attached File  freemason structure2.jpg   114.28K   89 downloadsAttached File  freemason structure2.jpg   114.28K   89 downloads
the handshake, conducted using the left hand is similar to left hand shake of boy scouts. Three foils or scout sign incorporated in the hand shake.

"The left-hand shake comes to us from the Ashanti warriors whom Baden-Powell met long ago in Africa. He saluted them with his right hand, but the Ashanti chieftain offered his left hand and said: 'In our land only the bravest of the brave shake hands with the left hand, because to do so we must drop our shields and our protection." excerpt taken from http://www.boyscoutt.../minute-252.asp

Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, founder of the Scout Movement....


i love the scout movement and its ideals and principles.

#19 BaLuKtOt

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 05:05 PM

i like this thread very informative
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#20 dgb1961

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 01:43 PM

mga sir tanong ko lng ano ba ang ikinamatay ni dr. frank horton??
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#21 vox populi

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 07:28 AM

the only information you can find in the web is that he died of natural causes.. he was 80 years old when he died, so it is safe to assume that old age just caught up with him..
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#22 dgb1961

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 08:15 AM

thnx po tolskie...:lol:
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#23 19wEngz25

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 12:19 PM

View PostchAdzkie1925, on 15 March 2010 - 08:24 PM, said:

Frank Reed Horton (17 Jul 1896 - 28 Aug 1966)

Posted Image


EARLY YEARS
. Frank Reed Horton was born  in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, (near Pittsburgh), on July 17, 1896. By the  time Frank was 13 years old his family had moved to Easton,  Pennsylvania. The year was 1910 and he was enrolled in preparatory  school studies at Lerchs Academy, situated in downtown Easton, just a  few blocks from Lafayette College. When the family moved to Norwalk,  Connecticut, Frank continued his prep school studies at Worcester  Academy in Worcester, Massachusetts. In the two years he attended  Worcester Academy he played football, basketball and baseball. He also  excelled in other school activities. He served as the Business Manager  of the academy's weekly paper, THE VIGORNIA, and excelled in debate. He  became a member of Sigma Zeta Kappa Debating Society. On June 7, 1913,  presenting his topic "The Man Without a Country" by Edward Everett  Hale, Frank won the annual Dexter Award and a $25 prize. In May 1914,  Frank was elected to serve as president of the debating society.
  
  In 1915 after leaving Worcester Academy Frank worked the next two years  during the day as a law clerk for Robert A. Fosdick, Esquire, in  Stamford, Connecticut; and at night he studied law extension courses  from LaSalle College in Chicago. In the fall of 1916, at the age of 20,  he enrolled at Boston University Law School, where his freshman courses  were criminal law, agency, torts, sales, contract and property.
  
  One of the more significant events in his life at this time was his  joining in Sigma Alpha Epsilon social fraternity on November 4, 1916.  It would be a few years later when, as a war veteran returning to  school, he would find himself on the Lafayette College campus and  residing at the SAE house. That would be the place where he would begin  Alpha Phi Omega.
  
  As with many young people, Frank's parents were major influences in his  life. Frank was close to his mother mainly because his father traveled  a lot in his professional life. But even so, his father continued to  wield heavy influence on Frank's law studies. Just as it would appear  that Frank would continue his pursuit of law, the world war in Europe  was felt in America. On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war  against Germany. The War Army Act, a selective draft of 1,000,000 men  ages 21 to 30, was passed by congress on May 1 S, 1917. Frank was 21.  World War I would change Frank's focus forever.
  
  MASONRY And The WAR YEARS. Although Horton's Masonry and war  related experiences are not really interrelated they were both  significant events occurring at the same time period. On June 18, 1918,  Frank entered the Blue Lodge, Scottish Rite Masonic order Western Star  #37 A.F.&A.M. in Norfolk, Connecticut. Several years later he would  expand his Masonic life while on naval duty in Kirkwall, Scotland.
  
  On June 21, 1918, Frank R. Horton enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve  Force at New London, Connecticut. He reported for training on July 22,  1918, in Newport, Rhode Island, as a Radio Electrician. He transferred  October 5, 1918, to the naval unit at Boston University for additional  studies. While there he achieved Chief Boatswain's Mate rating on  December 19, 1918. It should be noted that Germany signed the Armistice  effectively ending the war on November 1 1, 1918, yet many tasks for  the military, especially for the Navy, needed to be completed. With a  commitment to the Navy for almost two more years Frank continued to  improve himself, taking and passing competitive exams to become an  officer. In 1919 he entered Naval Offficers-Material Training School,  at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
  
  Frank Reed Horton was commissioned an Ensign on April 17,1919. He  immediately reported to the First Naval District in Boston for active  service on the USS Whippoorwill, a newly commissioned minesweeper. The  first duty assignment for the ship was to the North Sea to participate  in the detonation of 57,000 magnetic mines strung from Orkney Islands,  just north of Scotland, and due east to Stavanger, Norway. Frank would  serve as a Watch Offficer, Navigation Offficer, Signal Offficer and  Inspection Offficer while on sea duty.
  
  But it was Frank's previous legal training that drew him away from his  regular assignments and into special duties with the navy court martial  system involving young seamen. More than a few, who, facing dangers and  being away from home and lacking personal guidance, found themselves in  trouble with navy rules and regulations. The matter of strengthening  principles in young men would influence Frank forever. Here we see  another significant event that would allow him to readily accept the  principles of Scouting in his life as well as those of Rotary, Masonry  and other organizations.
  
  On August 8, 1919, at Kirkwall, Scotland, in the Orkney Islands, he  entered the Royal Arch Chapter #209 of the York Rite. He would later  receive Life Member Militia Templi Preceptory St. Magnus recognition on  April 23,1922, upon returning to the United States.
  
  The USS Whippoorwill returned March 1920 to Charleston, South Carolina,  with Frank obtaining his naval discharge June 23, 1920, in  Philadelphia. He would earn the World War I Victory Medal and the  Minesweeper Clasp. From 1920 to 1922 after leaving the Navy Frank  managed his father's 11-acre hog and chicken stock farm, known as  Stoneacre, in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. While in Carlisle he joined  Kiwanis and the Knights of Pythias.
  
  LAFAYETTE COLLEGE, SCOUTING, ALPHA PHI OMEGA. In the summer of  1922 Frank moved to Columbus, Ohio. This information was gleaned from  Masonic records showing his change from Norwalk, Connecticut to  affiliation in the East Gate Lodge #603 in Galena, a suburb of  Columbus, Ohio. In the ensuing years he received the 32nd degree Prince  of the Royal Secret (Scottish Rite) Masonic Order from the Ordo ab Chao  Supreme Council 33rd Jurisdiction at Grand East, in Boston,  Massachusetts. Masonic Orders were a continuing vital part of Frank  Reed Horton's life. Later Frank would resign from Valley of Scranton  Masonic Lodge, March 8, 1926, to enter the Valley of Allentown Masonic  Lodge on June 3, 1927, while still maintaining his ties to the Blue  Lodge at East Gate #603 in Ohio.
  
  In the fall of 1923 Frank enrolled at Lafayette College as a sophomore.  That year his course of studies included history, English, psychology,  ethics and religion. He was 27 years old. In November of 1923 Frank  attended the American Legion Armistice Ball held at the Easton armory,  where he met another naval veteran, 10 years his senior, Herbert George  Horton, who had served as a lieutenant on a destroyer. In sharing  military stories and discussing the events of the day Herb, then Easton  Area Council Scout Executive, told Frank about Scouting and launched  Frank on his first Scouting assignment as Deputy Scout Commissioner for  South Side District and as interim Scoutmaster for a Scout Troop. Later  Frank would state, "In the Scout Oath and Law, I found the standard I  had been seeking, a standard of manhood that would stand the test of  time, and it was worldwide for friendship, understanding and world  peace."
  
  The events of Frank Reed Horton's life throughout this time period, his  family life, religious faith, study of law, military experience,  membership in Masonry and newly found ideals of Scouting allowed him to  have the energy, conviction, dedication and vision to provide the  leadership necessary for the next stage. Frank Reed Horton had the  conviction, dedication and vision to lead a group of 14 fellow students  who worked creatively and diligently to lay the foundation and  structure our Fraternity Alpha Phi Omega.
  
  *Article was written by Paul M. H. Lienhardt, '51, Alpha Psi  Chapter, Lehigh University, Lehigh, Pennsylvania. (Copyright © 2001,  Alpha Phi Omega. All rights reserved.) Brother Lienhardt spent many  hours of research on the early life of our Founder, and has given us a  detailed view of Frank Reed Horton that might have remained hidden with  the passage of time. We have all read "The Story of the Founding,"  written by our Founder, in the Pledge Manual. Here is the rest of his  story. We are very gratefull for the dedicated work, zeal, and  determination that Brother Lienhardt has devoted to compile this  historical aspect on the early life of our Founder, Frank Reed Horton.



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#24 shotgun_banjo

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 05:33 PM

Frank Reed Horton's grave

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#25 shotgun_banjo

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 05:34 PM

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#26 naraht

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 05:29 AM

Note, founder Donald H Fritts is buried in the same cemetary




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