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#1 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:56 AM

Don CAMILO OSIAS
Past Grand Master - 1955
Grand Lodge of the Philippines

Lodge named after MW Camilo Osias: Don Camilo Osias  Memorial No. 253 in Malaybalay City, Bukidnon

“More Masonry among Masons, more men in Masonry.”

            Camilo Osias was a man of vigorous intellect, tremendous drive, and a passion for Philippine freedom and independence. He belongs to that rare breed of men who, in any nation, emerge, through life's many trials and challenges, with the integrity of their convictions unsullied by the stains of graft and corruption and with their vision undimmed by the fog of doubt and confusion "I want to serve", declared Osias "My training in college and in the university of hard work and hard knocks, and my experience in varied fields -legislative and administrative - I think, qualify me to serve. I am prepared to serve the Republic. I offer my all to the sovereign people whose rights and liberties I am pledged to preserve and defend."  

            Having been chosen as one of the 1905 government pensionados to the United States, he obtained his Teacher's Diploma from the Illinois State Teacher College, his Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Education degrees from Columbia University, and his Graduate Diploma in Administration and Supervision from the same University. In 1934, Otterbain College of Ohio awarded him the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws; National University bestowed upon him the degree of Doctor of Pedagogy, honoris causa, in 1961.  

This public servant with an indefatigable capacity for hard work rose from classroom teacher to First Filipino Division Superintendent of Schools. But he left public service to become the First President of the National University.  

A scholar and distinguished writer, he edited the well-known and durable Philippine Readers, widely known as the Osias Readers, which were used for decades in primary and elementary schools. He wrote The Filipino Way of Life, the prize winning biography Jose Rizal: His Life and Times, and many other books and articles. An avid Rizalist, he published numerous articles on Rizal and translated into English and Ilocano many of the hero's major and minor works.  

His signed two Constitutions of the Philippines. As delegate of the first district of La Union to the Constitutional Convention in 1934, he actively participated in committee work and in debates on the floor. With others, he is credited for the educational provisions in the Constitution of the Philippines, the Preamble, and the economic provisions therein.  

Osias, the legislator and Constitutional Convention delegate, was an outstanding champion of academic freedom and civil liberties, which he considered as the true foundations of democratic polity.  

In 1921, he was named a member of the First Independence Mission to the United States; in 1929, he returned to America serving as Resident Commissioner to the United States Congress until 1935 and worked zealously for the Independence Bill.  

In the rough and tumble of politics, the colossus of La Union displayed sagacity and integrity of conviction. In 1925, he won as Senator of the second Senatorial district. Since then, he was elected several more times - as Assemblyman in 1935; as Senator at large, topping the Senatorial list, in 1947; as Senator again in 1961. He served both as Minority and as Majority Leader of the Senate, and then as President of this Upper Chamber of Congress.  

In Masonry, Osias was initiated, passed, and raised in Bagumbayan Lodge No.4 in August 1918. In 1948, he became Master of his Lodge. He was elected Junior Grand Warden in 1952, Senior Grand Warden in 1953, Deputy Grand Master in 1954, and Grand Master in 1955. Many still remember his stirring inaugural address, in which he told the Brethren.  

"The Cosmopolitan composition of our Ancient and Venerable Fraternity is a positive attestation of widespread appeal and the universal character of Freemasonry. This patent fact emboldens me to sound the call to the brethren of our Grand Jurisdiction for greater unity. Genuine harmony must prevail in truer measure in our ranks especially in the face of stepped-up efforts to undermine our Order from inimical quarters. As Grand Master I hereby entreat all Lodges and all members to rally to the imperious call of the hour: MORE MASONRY AMONG MASONS, MORE MEN IN MASONRY.  

"This is at once an orientation and a program. Let it be taken to heart. Let it be repeated often. Let it be implemented. Let it be lived."  

True to his word, he repeated his program often, implemented it, and lived it.  

In the Scottish Rite, Osias became a Master of the Royal Secret in October 1938 in the Philippine Bodies and was one of those who organized the Luzon Bodies in 1948. Two years later, in 1950, the Supreme Council of the Philippines honored him with his investiture as Knight Commander of the Court of Honor and then in January 1952 elected and crowned him Active Member and Sovereign Grand Inspector General of the Supreme Council. He served in several offices of the Supreme Council for almost two decades. When Sovereign Grand Commander Conrado Benitez passed to the next life on January 4, 1971, a special meeting of the Supreme Council was held on January 28, 1971 and Osias was elected Sovereign Grand Commander to serve out the unfinished term of Benitez. In 1973 Osias was re-elected to his own three year term as Sovereign Grand Commander, but a lingering illness forced him to tender his resignation barely a few months after his re-election.  

Osias was also active in the other Masonic organizations. He was a member of Manila Chapter No.2, RAM, a Shriner, and a member of Rosario Villaruel Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star. His wife, Avelina L. Osias, was a worthy Matron of Sampaguita Chapter No.3, O.E.S.  

Manuel Osias' and Gregoria Oliviano's son born at Balaoan, La Union on March 23, 1889 is today remembered as one of the foremost statesmen our country has ever produced - a writer, educator, and patriot who dedicated his whole life to the education of the youth and to the service of his people. His death on May 20, 1976 was mourned by the entire nation.

Source: Kinship to Greatness http://www.glphils.org

Additional information: Don Camilo Osias is the person behind the "Philippine Hymm", the English version of our Philippine National Anthem.

Source: http://vincemd.blogspot.com/2010/08/palma-...philippine.html



#2 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 01:22 AM

Salvador P. Lopez

Lodge named after Bro. Salvador Lopez: Don Salvador P. Lopez No. 276 in Mati, Davao Oriental

Salvador Ponce Lopez(May 27, 1911–October 18, 1993), born in Currimao, Ilocos Norte, is an Ilokano writer, journalist, educator, diplomat, and statesman.

He studied at the University of the Philippines and obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in English in 1931 and a Master of Arts degree, also in philosophy, in 1933. During his UP days, he became a drama critic for the Philippine Collegian. From 1933 to 1936, he taught literature and journalism at the University of Manila. He also became a daily columnist and magazine editor of the Philippine Herald until World War 2.

In 1940, Lopez' essay "Literature and Society" won in the Commonwealth Literary Awards. This essay posited that art must have substance and that poet Jose Garcia Villa's adherence to "art for art's sake" is decadent. The essay provoked debates, the discussion centered on proletarian literature, i.e., engaged or committed literature versus the art for art’s sake literary orientation.

He was appointed by President Diosdado Macapagal as Secretary of Foreign affairs and was ambassador to the United Nations for six years before reassigned to France for seven years.

Lopez was the president of the University of the Philippines from 1969 to 1975. And he established a system of democratic consultation in which decisions such as promotions and appointments were made through greater participation by the faculty and administrative personnel; he also reorganized U.P. into the U.P. System. It was during his presidency that U.P. students were politically radicalized, launching mass protests against the Marcos regime, from the so-called "First Quarter Storm" in 1970 to the "Diliman commune" in 1971. During the Diliman Commune, Lopez called the students, faculty, and employees to defend UP and its autonomy from militarization, since the military wanted to occupy the campus, searching for alleged leftists as well as activists opposing them. Many militants, out of his defense of UP's autonomy and democracy, considered him as a progressive and a militant member of the UP academe.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvador_P._L%C3%B3pez

Additional information:

Salvador Lopez was the associate editor of The Philippines Heral, Manila, 1933-1941 and editor of Monday Mail, Manila, 1939-1941. He was chief of cultural relations of office of foreign relations in 1946. From 1946, he was Philippine minister plenipotentiary and charge d'affairs, foreign affairs officer and political advisor to Philippine mission to United Nations. Raised in Bagumbayan Lodge No. 4, Manila, in 1940.

Source: http://books.google.com.ph/books?id=D-cCeO...p;q&f=false

#3 Buknoy

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 01:45 AM

Kuya, di naman yata masyadong kalakihan yang photo ni MW Osias.  Paki-palitan naman ng mas malake.  Hehehe.
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#4 Buknoy

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 01:49 AM



Frank Reed Horton
The Gentleman Mason
Quoted from Alpha Phi Omega, USA – Torch and Trefoil

Early Years

Frank Reed Horton was born in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, (near Pittsburgh), on July 17, 1896. By the time Frank was 13 years old his family had moved to Easton, Pennsylvania. The year was 1910 and he was enrolled in preparatory school studies at Lerchs Academy, situated in downtown Easton, just a few blocks from Lafayette College. When the family moved to Norwalk, Connecticut, Frank continued his prep school studies at Worcester Academy in Worcester, Massachusetts. In the two years he attended Worcester Academy he played football, basketball and baseball. He also excelled in other school activities. He served as the Business Manager of the academy’s weekly paper, THE VIGORNIA, and excelled in debate. He became a member of Sigma Zeta Kappa Debating Society. On June 7, 1913, presenting his topic “The Man Without a Country” by Edward Everett Hale, Frank won the annual Dexter Award and a $25 prize. In May 1914, Frank was elected to serve as president of the debating society.

In 1915 after leaving Worcester Academy Frank worked the next two years during the day as a law clerk for Robert A. Fosdick, Esquire, in Stamford, Connecticut; and at night he studied law extension courses from La Salle College in Chicago. In the fall of 1916, at the age of 20, he enrolled at Boston University Law School, where his freshman courses were criminal law, agency, torts, sales, contract and property.

One of the more significant events in his life at this time was his joining in Sigma Alpha Epsilon social fraternity on November 4, 1916. It would be a few years later when, as a war veteran returning to school, he would find himself on the Lafayette College campus and residing at the SAE house. That would be the place where he would begin Alpha Phi Omega.

As with many young people, Frank’s parents were major influences in his life. Frank was close to his mother mainly because his father traveled a lot in his professional life. But even so, his father continued to wield heavy influence on Frank’s law studies. Just as it would appear that Frank would continue his pursuit of law, the world war in Europe was felt in America. On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war against Germany. The War Army Act, a selective draft of 1,000,000 men ages 21 to 30, was passed by congress on May 18, 1917. Frank was 21. World War I would change Frank’s focus forever.



Masonry and the War Years


Although Horton’s Masonry and war related experiences are not really interrelated they were both significant events occurring at the same time period. On June 18, 1918, Frank entered the Blue Lodge, Scottish Rite Masonic order Western Star #37 A.F.&A.M. in Norfolk, Connecticut. Several years later he would expand his Masonic life while on naval duty in Kirkwall, Scotland.

On June 21, 1918, Frank R. Horton enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve Force at New London, Connecticut. He reported for training on July 22, 1918, in Newport, Rhode Island, as a Radio Electrician. He transferred October 5, 1918, to the naval unit at Boston University for additional studies. While there he achieved Chief Boatswain’s Mate rating on December 19, 1918. It should be noted that Germany signed the Armistice effectively ending the war on November 11, 1918, yet many tasks for the military, especially for the Navy, needed to be completed. With a commitment to the Navy for almost two more years Frank continued to improve himself, taking and passing competitive exams to become an officer. In 1919 he entered Naval Officers-Material Training School, at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Frank Reed Horton was commissioned an Ensign on April 17, 1919. He immediately reported to the First Naval District in Boston for active service on the USS Whippoorwill, a newly commissioned minesweeper. The first duty assignment for the ship was to the North Sea to participate in the detonation of 57,000 magnetic mines strung from Orkney Islands, just north of Scotland, and due east to Stavanger, Norway. Frank would serve as a Watch Officer, Navigation Officer, Signal Officer and Inspection Officer while on sea duty.

But it was Frank’s previous legal training that drew him away from his regular assignments and into special duties with the navy court martial system involving young seamen. More than a few, who, facing dangers and being away from home and lacking personal guidance, found themselves in trouble with navy rules and regulations. The matter of strengthening principles in young men would influence Frank forever. Here we see another significant event that would allow him to readily accept the principles of Scouting in his life as well as those of Rotary, Masonry and other organizations.

On August 8, 1919, at Kirkwall, Scotland, in the Orkney Islands, he entered the Royal Arch Chapter #209 of the York Rite. He would later receive Life Member Militia Templi Preceptory St. Magnus recognition on April 23, 1922, upon returning to the United States.

The USS Whippoorwill returned March 1920 to Charleston, South Carolina, with Frank obtaining his naval discharge June 23, 1920, in Philadelphia. He would earn the World War I Victory Medal and the Mine sweeper Clasp. From 1920 to 1922 after leaving the Navy Frank managed his father’s 11-acre hog and chicken stock farm, known as Stone acre, in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. While in Carlisle he joined Kiwanis and the Knights of Pythias.

In the summer of 1922 Frank moved to Columbus, Ohio. This information was gleaned from Masonic records showing his change from Norwalk, Connecticut to affiliation in the East Gate Lodge #603 in Galena, a suburb of Columbus, Ohio. In the ensuing years he received the 32nd degree Prince of the Royal Secret (Scottish Rite) Masonic Order from the Ordo ab Chao Supreme Council 33rd Jurisdiction at Grand East, in Boston, Massachusetts. Masonic Orders were a continuing vital part of Frank Reed Horton’s life. Later Frank would resign from Valley of Scranton Masonic Lodge, March 8, 1926, to enter the Valley of Allentown Masonic Lodge on June 3, 1927, while still maintaining his ties to the Blue Lodge at East Gate #603 in Ohio.



Lafayette College -
Scouting -
Alpha Phi Omega -



In the fall of 1923 Frank enrolled at Lafayette College as a sophomore. That year his course of studies included History, English, Psychology, Ethics and Religion. He was 27 years old. In November of 1923 Frank attended the American Legion Armistice Ball held at the Easton armory, where he met another naval veteran, 10 years his senior, Herbert George Horton, who had, served as a lieutenant on a destroyer. In sharing military stories and discussing the events of the day Herb, then Easton Area Council Scout Executive, told Frank about Scouting and launched Frank on his first Scouting assignment as Deputy Scout Commissioner for South Side District and as interim Scoutmaster for a Scout Troop. Later Frank would state, “In the Scout Oath and Law, I found the standard I had been seeking, a standard of manhood that would stand the test of time, and it was worldwide for friendship, understanding and world peace.”

The events of Frank Reed Horton’s life throughout this time period, his family life, religious faith, study of law, military experience, membership in Masonry and newly found ideals of Scouting allowed him to have the energy, conviction, dedication and vision to provide the leadership necessary for the next stage. Frank Reed Horton had the conviction, dedication and vision to lead a group of 14 fellow students who worked creatively and diligently to lay the foundation and structure the Fraternity — Alpha Phi Omega.



Masonry in the Philippines -

From the archives and records of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Philippines, several communications were discovered and the following facts were unearthed:

During his residency in the country, he Affiliated with Zapote Lodge No. 29, F. & A.M. but requested for a Demit in the early part of 1951;
His request for a Demit was given due course in the early part of 1952 and finally formalized when MW Antonio Gonzalez, PGM, then Grand Secretary, communicated with Silvergate Lodge No. 296, F.&A.M.;
He was eventually elected to membership by Affiliation at the Silver Gate Lodge No. 296, F. & A. M., San Diego, California, USA on April 4, 1952.

----

Seal of Frank Reed Horton Memorial Lodge No. 379


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Source: http://www.frankreedhorton.org/
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#5 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 02:03 AM

Sorry sorry.. Paano i-edit?hehehe

#6 Buknoy

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 02:07 AM

O ayan na pinalitan ko na po
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#7 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 02:08 AM

Gen. Mariano Llanera

"Let us fight to the finish"

Lodge named after Bro. Mariano Llanera: Gen. Llanera Mem. No. 168 in Bayanihan Gapan, Nueva Ecija

This lodge was named in honor of Mariano Llanera, a noted general in the Revolutionary Government headed by Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo. He is remembered for having led the first cry of Nueva Ecija against the tyranny of the Spaniards on September 2, 1896. Llanera was the Venerable Master of Masonic Triangle Centeno No. 82 that was established Cabiao, Nueva Ecija during the Spanish regime.

Source: http://genllanera168.bravehost.com/history.htm

Mariano Llanera (b. November 9,1855 - d. September 19,1942) was a revolutionary general who fought in the provinces of Bulacan, Tarlac, Pampanga and Nueva Ecija. He officially used a black flag with a white "K" on the left and a white skull-and-bones on the right in his battles.

Early Life
Mariano was a native of Cabiao, Nueva Ecija, who studied at the Colegio de San Juan de Letran. He became a cabeza de barangay (barrio chief) then a municipal captain for two terms. At first he was sympathetic to the Spanirads, but later he became a mason and rebel.

Katipunero
He became a member of the Katipunan in which he had his own banner depicting a white skull above two crossed bows, and the letter "K" against a field of black. He gathered about 3,000 men, they armed themselves by bolos, few guns and bamboo spears. With the brass band named BANDA MAKABAYAN DE CABIAO infront of them they took siege of a Spanish garrison in San Isidro, Nueva Ecija, for three days. But when the reinforcement of two hundred rifle-bearing Spanish troops arrived they were forced to retreat and leave their post. Llanera and his troops were also responsible for the insurgents in Bulacan, Tarlac, Pampanga and Nueva Ecija. The Spaniards wanted him badly, in order for him to surrender they thought of plan. They would kill civilians, demolished houses and jailed his preganant wife but he was not intimidated. After the death of Andres Bonifacio, he was designated as the lieutenant general in Montalban, Rizal. He also helped in the drafting of the Pact of Biak-na-Bato, 1897. He was also exiled in Hong Kong together with Emilio Aguinaldo.

American Era
When the Philippine-American broke out, he was in tha country and was assinged by Gen.Antonio Luna in Manila. In 1899, he was captured by the Americans and wrote the poem Sa Inang Bayang Filipinas while he was in prison. He was deported to Guam and returned to the Philippines in 1902. Lived in his hometown and remained there until his last days.

Source: http://en.wikipilipinas.org/index.php?title=Mariano_Llanera

Additional information:

General Mariano Llanera's battle Skull Flag(1896). General Mariano Llanera who fought in the provinces of Bulacan, Tarlac, Pampanga, and Nueva Ecija used a dull-looking black flag, with the single white letter K and the skull and crossbones symbol. The black color of the flag was inspired by the hood worn during the secret initiation rites of the first degree Katipuneros. The flag was for the camp of General Mariano Llanera of Cabiao, Nueva Ecija, who earned for himself a reputation as a brave and reckless fighter. "Let us fight to the finish," was one of his favorite remarks. Owing more to Freemasonry than to traditional Katipunero imagery. This flag looked like the pirates' banner in the Caribbean. It is said that Andres Bonifacio made fun of this flag, calling it Bungo ni Llanera or Llanera's skull.



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Source: http://www.philippinecountry.com/philippineflag.html





#8 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 02:10 AM

Thank you kuyang! Pa-kiss nga! laugh.gif

#9 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 03:03 AM

Juan Marquez Sumulong

Lodge named after Bro. Juan Sumulong: J. Sumulong Mem. No. 169. Capitol Masonic Temple, Quezon City

Juan Marquez Sumulong was born on December 27, 1874 at Antipolo, Rizal, and died on January 9, 1942, barely a month after the Japanese Occupation.  

Bro. Sumulong was initiated into the mysteries of Freemasonry in a lodge under the jurisdiction of Gran Oriente de Espana and during the frantic efforts by many to unify Philippine Masonry into only one roof, became charter member of the newly-organized Bagumbayan Lodge No. 4 on June 4, 1914.

Like Quezon, he also joined the Katipunan and after the PhilippineAmerican war ended, served as Secretary to the Governor of Morong (now Rizal) province.  He became a journalist, was admitted to the bar, was appointed Judge of the Court of First Instance in 1906 and in 1907 ran for a seat in the Philippine Assembly but lost.

He rejoined the government service in 1908 at the Court of Land Registration. In 1922 he was elected Senator and served as member of the Philippine Mission that worked for the Philippine Independence in the U.S. Congress.

In 1934, he was reelected Senator. In 1941, he ran against the charismatic Manuel Quezon for the presidency but lost.

At his deathbed, Sumulong told Jorge Bocobo and Jose Fabella that he and his party the Partido Nacional Progresista will not join the Japanese-sponsored government that ominously hang over the horizon, a conviction that no doubt, he steadfastly carried to his grave.

Source: http://glphils.org/famous-masons/fjmsumulong.htm



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#10 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 03:27 AM

JACOBO Z. ZOBEL
(1842-1896)

Lodge named after Bro Jacobo Zobel: Jacobo Zobel Mem. No. 202. Dau Street San Antonio Village Makati City
http://www.jacobozobel.org/

Jacobo Zobel was born on October 12, 1842 to Jacobo Zobel e Hinsch, a German, and Ana Zangroniz y Arrieta, a Filipina. His pharmacist father put up the Botica de Don Jacobo in on Real Street in Intramuros.

Most of his childhood was spent in Germany where he studied from 1848 to 1858, first at the school of Dr. Brandmann and in Johanneum public school. His father transferred him to Spain. He obtained his licenciado en farmacia y ciencias naturales from the Universidad Central de Madrid in Spain in 1864. He took courses in music and languages while completing his studies in pharmacy at the Central University. It was also during his stay in Spain when he became interested in numismatics.

From 1862 to 1863, he visited several coin museums in Paris, Berlin, and London and absorbed valuable knowledge on the subject. In 1863, he brought out his work, entitled Memoria sobre las monedas libeofenicias teutetanas. The title was later on changed to Noticias de various
monomentos que demuestra la existencia de un Alfabeto Desconocido Empleado Antiguamente en algunas regions de la Betica.

He helped run the family business when he returned to Manila in December 1863 and had to take full responsibility upon the death of his father while on a tour to the United States in 1866. Being a member of the mason since around 1866 and secretary of the First Scottish Lodge
before 1869, he was known for his liberal ideals. Historian and scholar, Teodoro M. Kalaw, as the “premier Filipino mason.” His progressive and liberal ideas were put to good use when the archipelago came under the governorship of the equally liberal Carlos de la Torre. The Governor
appointed him to the regidorship of Manila, which he served until December 31, 1870. But De la Torre was soon replaced, hence, the colonial society found itself under the shroud of official and ecclesiastic corruption and bigotry. Soon, the Spanish authorities used his outspoken views to
implicate him in the mutiny at the Cavite Arsenal that erupted in 1872. Thus, he was imprisoned in Fort Santiago and was released upon intervention of the German Consul.

On February 5, 1875, three years after this distressing episode, he found new happiness in his marriage to Trinidad Ayala de Roxas, who also belonged to affluent family in Manila. Their marriage bore them four children: Fernando, Enrique, Alfonso, and Margarita.

In June 1875, he and his bride journeyed to Japan, where he studied the native systems of government and education. In 1876, they sailed to the America and witnessed the World’s Fair in San Francisco. From there, they traveled around Europe - from London, to Paris, and to Seville
and lived for some years in Spain. Zobel used his time to study the modern transport system in Europe and renewed his interest in coins. Soon after, he published Estudio Historico de la Moneda Antigua Española desde Su Origen hasta el imperio Romano.

In 1880, he returned to the Philippines and worked with the Eiffel and Company, an enterprise based in Paris, which undertook the construction of bridges, one of which was the Quinta Bridge in Quiapo. On June 7, 1881, he obtained a permit to build five tramway lines
within Manila and the surrounding areas. One of these lines was the Manila-Tondo line, which was later stretched to Malabon, under the financial backing of the Spanish banker, Adolfo Bayo.

His partnership with the Spanish banker and other prominent businessmen deepened when they founded the company Compania de los Tranvias de Filipinas in Madrid on December 28, 1885. Its board of directors was composed of Bayo as president, based in Spain; D.G. Tuason
as vice-president, based in the Philippines, with himself and Don Fernandez as members.

Zobel entered the government service, first as member of the Consejo de Administracion made by the King of Spain himself in 1882. He likewise served as a member of the Junta de Aranceles (Tariff Board), Real Sociedad Economica de Amigos del Pais, and the Junta Central de
Agricultura as secretary of its industries section. Later, he became the municipal pharmacist for Intramuros and a conciliario of the Banco Español Filipino.

An avowed scholar who became a respected member of the Real Academia de la Historia, Zobel also distinguished himself as a linguist. Apart from Spanish, he was adept in French, German, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek, Chaldean, and Etruscan. For pastimes, he collected
art, not just coins, and enjoyed hunting.

He was the recipient of several prestigious awards: the Gran Cruz de la Real Orden Americana de Isabel la Catolica, given in 1880; the Caballero de la Orden de Carlos III; the title of knight commander of the Order of the Northern Star of Sweden and Norway, and gold medals
from the Paris-based Numismatique Allier de Hauteroche and the Exposicion Regional de Filipinas held in 1895 in Manila.

He died on October 6, 1896, just more than a month after the outbreak of the Philippine Revolution.

Source: http://www.nhi.gov.ph/downloads/sm0039.pdf




#11 Buknoy

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 03:58 AM


Macario R. Ramos, Sr.
Founding Grand Master
Supreme Council, Order of DeMolay
Republic of the Philippines


MACARIO R. RAMOS MEMORIAL LODGE NO. 355

The Lodge is named in honor of the First Grand Master of the Supreme Council Order of Demolay, Republic of the Philippines. A noted insuranceman. A world war II veteran with the Rank of Colonel, a Survivor of the death march from Bataan to Capas, Tarlac and a very much well-loved by the youth, whose unselfish contributions to Masonry, the Brethren felt should be recognized.

          On May 24, 2003 Thirty Three Master Masons addressed a petition to the MW Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the Philippines, praying for a permission to organize a Lodge at the Scottish Rite Temple, in Taft Avenue, Malate Manila, to be named “Dad Macario R. Ramos Sr. Memorial Lodge “UD”.

          The petition was favorably endorsed by Very Worshipful Ramoncito P. Javier District Deputy Grand Master of Masonic District No. 1 and worshipful Brother Jose A. Roncesvalles- Worshipful Master of Cosmos Lodge No. 8

          Most Worshipful Napoleon A. Soriano, PGM with the authority of Most Worshipful Ricardo G. Galvez, Grand Master. With the assistance of RW Jaime Y. Gonzales – Junior Grand Warden who acted as Master of Ceremonies instituted Dad Macario R. Ramos Sr. Memorial Lodge UD., on February 20. 2004 and on the same day the officers of the Lodge were installed into office, the Lodge had no problem securing a Charter from the MW Grand Lodge, during the Annual Communication held in April 2005 at the Tagaytay Convention Center, Tagaytay City.

          On May 2, 2005, Most Worshipful Hermogenes E. Ebdane Jr., Grand Master together with his Grand Line Officers, personally Constituted Macario R. Ramos Memorial Lodge No. 355, F. & A.M., at the Scottish Rite Temple, 1828 Taft Avenue, Malate, Manila.

          With Worshipful Brother Reynaldo M. Tomampo as the Worshipful Master Bro. Charles G. Agar as the Senior Warden and Bro. Januario E. Sia-Cunco, as the Junior Warden.

         Today Macario R. Ramos Memorial No. 355, F. & A.M., is hailed as one of the Most Dynamic and Active Lodge of Masonic NCR-A Thanks to the dedication of its members.



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Source: http://mrrml355.blogspot.com/

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Buknoy's Note:  I had the honor and the privilege of personally knowing Dad Mac Ramos before he dropped his working tools back in the 90's.  He is one great man, truly a lover of the DeMolay movement.
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#12 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 04:15 AM

JUAN S. ALANO
Past Grand Master - 1961
Grand Lodge of the Philippines

Lodge named after MW Juan Alano: Juan S. Alano No. 137. Isabela, Basilan

             The man who was elevated to the Grand Oriental Chair in 1961 proved, through his exploits, the Disraeli-authored truism, "Success is the child of audacity.”

             Born of parents of modest means in Malolos, Bulacan on February 8, 1891, the young Juan S. Alano learned to be daring. Irrepressible, even before finishing his grade-school studies, he left his hometown for the Big City. A strong hope of getting life's better deal in Manila must have sprung in his young breast! That hope was partly made into a reality because, although he did odd jobs in the City, he was able to finish a licentiate in commerce at the Ateneo de Manila and to graduate from the University of Santo Tomas with an A.B. degree.

             Now more confident owing to his work experience and his studies and at the same time impelled by the desire to travel, he trained his resolute sight on the promise of Southern Philippines. Alano sailed for Iloilo, where he got employed as a clerk in an American law office. Exposed to the legal profession, he developed an interest in, and therefore dedicated himself to a self-study of Law. His efforts did pay him dividends, for he passed the Bar examinations given in 1914.

             It was during his Iloilo adventure that he met a public school teacher from Bago, Negros Oriental, the former Ramona Torres, with whom he had two sons and two daughters.

             The audacity of the couple to sail to Mindanao changed the course of their life together, for Alano acquired three large coconut plantations in Basilan City, as well as the Pagadian Light and Power Company, the Basilan General Hospital, the Basilan Lines, and the Basilan Rural Bank.

             Professionally successful, Alano decided to run for the House of Representatives. Again, representing Mindanao and Sulu, he was not to be denied. Indeed, he was a member of the House of Representatives for many years.

            It was also in Southern Philippines that his Masonic life began. In 1919, he was initiated, passed and raised in Mount Apo Lodge No.45 in Zamboanga; and Master of his Lodge, he became, in 1924, and again in 1934. He also helped in the organization of Basilan Lodge No.127 and served as its first Master. In 1958 he was elected Junior Grand Warden, in 1959 Senior Grand Warden, and Deputy Grand Master in 1960. By tradition everyone expected him to be elevated by the suffrage of his Brethren to the Grand Oriental Chair in 1961. Unexpectedly disaster struck. Barely a few weeks before the Annual Communication he suffered a heart attack that reduced him to a living vegetable, unable to use his limbs. His face was twisted and he lost the power of speech.  

           Providentially, the then Senior Grand Warden William H. Quasha met Mr Laurence Hammond of Chicago, a prayer healer, whom he immediately brought to the sick bed of Alano. Hammond prayed for Alano’s speedy recovery. It was simple, but electrifying and spellbinding. Hammond placed his hands on the forehead of Alano and in a low tone of voice just above his breath pronounced his prayer.. Miraculously and almost instantaneously, in full view of those gathered around the sick bed, the twisted face of Alano brightened up and he started to speak. His first words were about the Fraternity. He expressed a willingness to serve if elected Grand Master.

          The delegates to the Annual Communication elected him in absentia and on installation day he was brought by an ambulance to the Grand Lodge in a stretcher.

          During the first months of his term, Alano was too weak to discharge all his duties so he had to rely on Deputy Grand Master Quasha and the other officers. By mid-term, however, he was strong enough to discharge all his duties to the full measure of his responsibilities. The following year Alano repaid his debt of gratitude to Grand Master Quasha. He accompanied Quasha in his visitations and even picked up the tab.

         Alano joined the Scottish Rite in 1948. He became a KCCH in 1954 and a 33° IGH the following year. In 1956, he was crowned Active-Member.

         Five years after his election as Grand Master - on July 23, 1966, to be precise -  Juan C. Alano, 75 years old, met his creator in his home in Basilan City.

Source: http://glphils.org/kinship/alano.htm






#13 Liberty 299

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 04:32 AM

Buks dont forget the 2 lodges from my town. Yes 2 lodges in one town. General Manuel Tinio 167 and EUlogio DIzon lodge. Hindi ko nga lang alam ang background.

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#14 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 04:37 AM

LEONARDO TOLENTINO PAÑARES
October 30, 1921 – June 11, 1985

Lodge named after RW Leonardo Panares: Leonardo T. Pañares Mem No. 220. Maguindanao Masonic Temple, Capistrano St. Cagayan de Oro City
http://www.ltp220.org/default.html




The illustrious person in whose honor the Leonardo T. Pañares Lodge No. 220 was named was born in Pikit Cotabato. He was a protestant by faith.  He was the fifth of the seven children of Agustin Pañares and Adriana Tolentino of Barili and Naga, Cebu.  

         His early childhood was spent with the clan among the mineral deposits of Naga, Cebu and later in the spicy town of Batac, Ilocos Norte where he was nurtured by his loving stepmother Maria Crisostomo after his mother died.  His adolescent life was spent among the timberjacks of Agusan where his father, an educator helped established Christian schools when he retired as superintendent.

         He finished high school at the Agusan National High School. After finishing college at the Philippine Normal College in Manila, he attended regular training in military until he was commissioned as a regular officer of the Philippine Constabulary.  

         His early life in military was spent fighting in the Muslim territories of Jolo, Basilan, Tawi – tawi and Lanao.  In Lanao, he kept close watch over the military governor’s family (Marcelo Paiso – a MM of Maranao Lodge) that included the governor’s wife, Macaria Curso (an OES herself), two sons and Aurora Paiso the only daughter who also happens to be a dentist. After the hard labor, perpetual defense, intensive interrogation, cross examination and meticulous scrutiny, Aurora ended up to be his prized-catch bride.

         This union gave birth to six children: Marcel Agustin (Past Master of Sinukuan Lodge), Leonard Joseph (King), Adrienne Macrina (Queenie), Marian Ruth Carol (Bebel), Aurora Dawn (all sisters of the OES) and Ben Thomas Alexander otherwise known as Toby (also a MM of Sinukuan Lodge).

         While in service, he had an opportunity to get further schooling in criminology, investigation and intelligence training in Korea, and at the Australian Police College in Sydney, as well as further studies in Washington, D.C.  

         In 1972 at the height of martial law, he retired as a full pledged colonel.  Immediately after, he extended his service as the deputy director of the National Intelligence Coordinating Agency, a position he held until he dropped his working tools.
        
         Raised by the humble inspiration of his father Agustin, a mason and his stepmother, a member of the Order of Eastern Star and with the support of his father-in-law Marcelo also a mason of Maranaw Lodge, he himself became a mason.  He eventually became a dual member of Maguindanao Lodge and later on became its Worshipful Master.

         As an active mason, he co-organized the Cadena de Amor Chapter of the OES, the Order of Amaranth and became the charter sentinel of both organizations.  He has helped in the growth and development of the Order of Demolay Wadih C. Saab Chapter and as a consequence became its first Dad Advisor – a position he held for so many years.

         He supported, mentored and enriched the dynamic minds of the young masons who later on organized the Bugo de Oro Lodge among those included Very Worshipful Tom Garcia.  He was also a member of the higher bodies and its affiliated sub-organizations. A past president of the Aloha Shriners Club. He was likewise endorsed for a higher position in the grand lodge but unfortunately fate cut short his desire to further serve the fraternity.  The Grand Lodge of the Philippines through a posthumous award bestowed upon him the title of Right Worshipful for his exemplary service to Masonry.

         Thus ended the illustrious Masonic career of so great a man as Right Worshipful Leonardo T. Pañares, a legacy of selfless service and outstanding leadership to the craft.


Source: http://www.ltp220.org/about_ltp.html



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#15 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 05:07 AM

SERAFIN L. TEVES
Past Grand Master - 1965
Grand Lodge of the Philippines

Lodge named after MW Serafin Teves: Serafin L. Teves Mem No. 248

"We impress other people when we call a fellow mason a brother," Serafin L. Teves used to tell his Brother Masons, "but do we really mean it?" This is a query a number of Masons have been hard put to answer categorically. It was the Grand Master's tool of stimulating the Masons to co-operate in launching the Masonic leadership's general policy statement "Make Masons Manifest More Masonry" into a reality. The policy statement sounded euphonious because alliterative; generally however, it was the Brethren's fervent hope that the officers in the Grand Orient would give it more than just lip service. The hope was fervent because it was based on trust in the joint talents of their officers.

Teves' talents began to flower in Bais, Negros Oriental, where his parents, Don Emilio Teves and Doña Pilar Lajato were prominent citizens. Naturally, their youngest son Serafin, born on October 28, 1895, profited from that prominence. After his public-school education in his hometown, he transferred to Siliman Institute (now Siliman University), at Dumaguete in 1908. His father's death in 1913, however, interrupted his schooling. About a year later, he returned to Siliman to finish his junior high-school year. He finished the secondary course in Manila, where he served as private secretary of his uncle, Rep. Felipe Tayko.

He hankered to begin his studies in dentistry, but he had a change of heart. He went back to Bais in order to attend to the family farm. In 1919, he married the former Milagros Montenegro. They had 12 children who in turn gave the couple over 50 grandchildren. Besides managing his family's farm, he tenanted with his father-in-law. Hard work and discipline enabled him to acquire his own farm and additional landholdings. He ramified, eventually, into business: theatres, movie production, rural banking, hotel, cattle ranch, and other productive enterprises.

Teves was a disinterested person. Hence, he shared his time, energy and wealth for community service. He organized the Dumaguete Rotary Club, serving as its president. He also held the presidency of the Bais-Tanjay Sugar Planters Association twice. He was also a member of both the Dumaguete City Planning Commission and the Negros Oriental Planning Commission.

In 1923, he was drawn into politics through his appointment as councilor of Bais. Later, he was elected vice-mayor and then mayor. In 1955, he became Governor of Negros Oriental. But after his gubernatorial stint, he quit politics to devote more of his time to community work and to his Masonic activities. He served, likewise, as member of the Board of Review for Motion Pictures.

Teves was made a Master Mason in Mt. Kaladias Lodge No.91 in 1923, and served this Lodge as Master the following year. He became a Scottish Rite Mason in 1949, a Royal Arch Mason in 1951, and a Shriner in 1954. He was honored in the Scottish Rite with the rank and dignity of a Knight Commander if the Court of Honor in 1958, coroneted Inspector General Honorary in 1964 and crowned Sovereign Grand Inspector General in 1974. He was supervisor of the Supreme Council for the East Visayas Bodies, A. & A. S. R. Helping in the organization of the Josefa Llanes Escoda Chapter No.11, OES, he served the Chapter as Worthy Patron for two years. He lent a helping hand, too, in organizing the following: the Lodge of Perfection of Dumaguete, which metamorphosed into the East Visayas Bodies; the Royal Arch Chapter, the Leon Kilat Chapter of the Order of DeMolay; and Bethel No.3, Order of Job's Daughters.

After serving as District Deputy Grand Master for District No. 14, he was elected Junior Grand Warden in 1962, Senior Grand Warden in 1963, Deputy Grand Master in 1964, and Grand Master in 1965.

Masonic love is, as Teves would define it, never to say "Brother" without meaning it.

This Masonic giant passed to the next life on November 18, 1990 at the age of 95 years.

Source: http://glphils.org/kinship/teves.htm


#16 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 05:17 AM

TEODORO M. KALAW, SR.
Past Grand Master - 1928
Grand Lodge of the Philippines

Lodge named after MW Teodoro Kalaw: Teodoro M. Kalaw Mem. No. 136. Capitol Masonic Temple Quezon City


Ha muerto el Grande! That was the general feeling when Teodoro M. Kalaw was summoned to the Celestial Lodge on December 4, 1940. He was, definitely, a Grande for many reasons, one of which was his role in cementing brotherly love between the Grand Lodge of the Philippines and the Gran Oriente Español (of which he was himself a Grand Master). Looked up to by the Spanish Masons on account of his great wisdom, he greatly helped Mauel L.Quezon and Francis Burton Harrison in engineering the unification of the two Grand Lodges. He did so because. ...

Masonry favors no particular religion or political party and knows no national boundaries nor does it draw a color line, because in its work it needs all and excludes none. Hence, wherever Masonry is organized, it invites all good men to meet in its temples and from there watch and study the struggles without and the spirit of those engaged in them, in order to cool their ardor, calm their passions, mitigate their spite, reduce the number of victims, and succor those who are on the outside so that enemies may fraternize. It offers a plan of union and co-operation for raising and strengthening the spirit of humanity, depressed by those fratricidal struggles. It admits all programs, all confessions, all social systems, provided the principle of the brotherhood of man is respected and practiced. This is why Masonry constantly reminds all men that although they have to live and must work and even struggle in order that they may live, they must not hate each other, because they are all brothers, with God as father of all.

Kalaw, Sr. was a Grande because he was, among other thing, an author, a scholar, an orator, and a statesman of the highest order. How he came to be such a Grande and a Grand Master may be seen through a review of his eventful life.

He was born in Lipa, Batangas on March 31,1884. He grew up to become the "great interpreter and defender of Filipino liberty and nationalism," becoming the editor of El Renacimiento in 1907. As editor, be fearlessly defended Filipino rights and uncompromisingly advocated the Filipino cause: absolute independence. The editorial in his newspaper, entitled "Aves de Rapina," catapulted him to national figurehood. One of the Philippine-Commission members sued the paper for libel and damages. Shortly thereafter, the paper folded up.

Kalaw graduated from the Liceo de Manila, where he received his A.B., as well as from the Escuela de Derecho, where he obtained his LI.B. and, later, his LI.M.

In 1908, he was appointed Secretary of a Quezon-headed Commission to the International Conference on Navigation in Russia. He recorded the events of this trip in his first book, Hacia la Tierra del Zar (1908). He became, upon return to the Philippines, the Director of the Escuela de Derecho and professor of Constitutional Law. This appointment led to the publication of many books on Constitutional matters.

Then he ventured into politics, getting himself elected as Representative of Batangas to the Philippine Assembly in 1910. While he was a Representative, he wrote the following: "El Divorcio en Filipinas" (1911), "Como Se Puede Mejorar Nuestra Legislacion," "La Constitucion de Malolos" (1910), and "Las Ideas Politicas de la Revolucion Filipina. "

In 1916, Kalaw was appointed Director of the Philippine Library and Museum; in 1917, Secretary of Interior; and in 1920, Secretary of Instruction, succeeding the late Rafael Palma. Although he was extremely busy in his administrative responsibilities, he still was able to produce the following works: Manual de Ciencia Politica (1918), La Masoneria Filipinia (1920), La Revolucion Filipina (1924), Court-Martial of Andres Bonifacio (1926), and La Campaña del Kuomintang (1928).

In 1929, fortunately for his purposes, he was made Director of the National Library. He contributed some historical works: Epistolario Rizalino, five volumes; Las Cartas Politicds de Mabini (1930); El Espiritu de la Revolucion (1931); and La Revolucion Filipina, two volumes.

Don Teodoro was, by the way, appointed Executive Secretary and chief adviser of the Philippine Commission for Independence in 1922. Around this time, he wrote about Filipino culture and life in the United States. In 1935, he wrote Cinco Reglas de Nuestra Civilizacion Antigua, a sociological dissertation on Filipino courage, chastity, courtesy, knightly conduct, self-control, and family unity. By means of examples, proverbs and legends, he gave his readers insight into the mainstream of Philippine culture. Even in his column in La Vanguardia, a daily Spanish newspaper, Kalaw gave his countrymen cultural materials on the appreciation of Filipino social life and ideals.

His collection of Constitutions from other countries, including the Malolos Constitution of 1898, gave guidance to the delegates of the 1935 Constitutional Convention. His work, Planes Constitucionales, gave the delegates added vision.

Here is a summary of Kalaw's Masonic career:



Initiation, Nilad Lodge No.12                            -  April 8, 1907
Passing, Fellowcraft Degree                               -  March 7,1911
Raising, Master Mason                                       -  July 3,1914
Grand Master, Gran Logia
Junior Grand Warden, Grand Lodge
Grand Orator -1924-28
Grand Master -1928-29
Grand Orator -1931-32
Grand Secretary -1935-39
Grand Secretary Emeritus -1940

            He was, likewise, very active in the Scottish Rite Bodies. In fact, he was one of the few  who had the distinction of having been coroneted a 33° Mason before the Second World War.

Kalaw was a consummate believer in what Masonry could do to men. Thus, on January 22, 1929, he wrote:

And if I were asked now what I consider that phase of our external Masonry that we should study and promote in the near future for the maintenance of our Institution, I should frankly say to you: Let us Spread Masonry in the Far East among its various peoples. Let us have the natives of these isles and regions of Asia and Oceania mingle with other people in centers of fraternity, equality, and democracy, such as Freemasonry, in order that they may not only become better acquainted with each other that they may love each other and do good and practice charity together; but that they may love each other and teach the rest the benefits of that love. The coming years will be a time of intense activity and, perhaps, of unrest among the peoples of Asia and Oceania who have hitherto been sleeping. The West is flooding us with its men, its trade, its ideas, its principles, its methods, its institutions. The East is awakening and that awakening brings with it the consciousness of its own worth and responsibility. The final readjustment of the struggle of interests and civilization that is drawing near will inevitably be preceded by serious conflicts that it is our duty to prevent, or the bad effects of which we must at least endeavor to palliate. Let us organize Lodges in every important city of the Orient and have natives and foreigners fraternize in them daily. This will show that they are Brethren who can live together without any necessity for hating each other; and it will introduce into the future relations an element of love and unity that will be indispensable for the progress and harmonious living together of these races.

Leo Fischer, Managing Editor of the pre-war Cabletow wrote an editorial on Kalaw on February 1,1929. It is quoted in toto, for it is full of insights regarding Kalaw's Masonic life.

                              OUR OUTGOING GRAND MASTER
Most Worshipful Brother Teodoro M. Kalaw has turned over the Grand Gavel to his successor after an administration during which we had renewed evidence that this eminent Mason enjoys the love, confidence, and esteem of the Craft to the fullest extent. No spectacular achievements are to be recorded for his year of office; but our Institution has pursued the even tenor of its way; peace and harmony have prevailed, and there have been no quarrels and schisms, no scandals and disgraceful incidents, no desertions and acts of disloyalty. And our Brother is not like a meteor that comes and goes, as some Grand Masters have done, bursting forth from the darkness and disappearing in the encircling gloom after a short career. He has been visible on the Masonic horizon since the early days of our Grand Lodge and will, we trust, remain an asset to the Grand Body of Philippine Masonry and our Institution as a whole until the Celestial Grand Lodge above shall claim him. And even then the products of his pen will continue his work among us.

Kalaw will always be remembered as having performed the duties of the office of Grand Master in a most conscientious, able, and unassuming way which has earned him the gratitude and admiration of his Brethren in Freemasonry.

Kalaw was invited at the constitution of Mencius Lodge No.93 on June 28, 1924. This is what he wrote then:

It is said that Masonry is a secret organization, yet secrets in the strict sense of the word, have no place in our Order. True we practice secrecy, but only for the purpose of preventing idle and malicious talk. We prefer that what we do be done quietly, without vulgar display, without conceit, because charity, brotherly love, and good deeds are things which are seen and not heard, and are never made for public acclaim.

When he involved himself in various Masonic activities, indeed, Kalaw exemplified what he had written.

When Newton C. Comfort had, for health’s sake, to quit his position as Grand Secretary, Kalaw, despite his tight schedule, decided to place his talents and efforts "at the service of the Royal Art with enthusiasm and devotion." In the February 1, 1935 issue of the Cabletow, Leo Fischer wrote an editorial entitled "Our New Grand Secretary," which partly reads thus:

...He might well have reposed on his laurels after serving as our Grand Master with credit to himself and honor to the Fraternity; but when a worthy successor to Most Wor. Bro. Comfort was needed, M.W. Bro. Kalaw responded to the call and we see him again a Grand Officer this time adorned with the crossed pens of the Gland Secretary.

We hope and trust that our Grand Lodge will derive great benefit from the effort of our eminent Brother in the Grand Secretary's Office and that he will find his task, though it be arduous and burdensome, pleasant and satisfying. ..



Kalaw did find his task as Grand Secretary pleasant and satisfying because, as he had always done, he did it not only from a sense of duty but also for the benefit of the Fraternity he loved.

In fact, he wrote a number of articles in the Cabletow for the benefit of his Brethren within Cabletow reach. One of such articles expressed his belief in democracy. Listen:

Now we have democracy in the Philippines. Democracy was the ideal of the first Filipino Masons. It was the ideal of the Philippine Revolution. It is the objective of all Filipinos of today. But this notwithstanding, there is as much reason why Masonry should exist now, as there was in the past, and perhaps even more. Like every thing human, democracy has its inevitable drawbacks, due either to those who misunderstand it or fail to practice it as they should, or to those who consciously or unconsciously use it to further their own selfish ends. Democracy carries the human struggles into a more open and hard-fought field, hence its danger.

Teodoro M. Kalaw, Sr. died three score years ago, but the spirit of his ideals and the memory of his accomplishments live on. ..(SPF)

Source: http://www.glphils.org/kinship/kalaw2.htm





#17 jed

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 11:38 PM

GAT ANDRES BONIFACIO

€œGreat Plebian€

Lodge named after Bro. Andres Bonifacio: Andres Bonifacio No. 199. Capitol Masonic Temple, Quezon City
http://www.abl199.org/index.html




Called the €œGreat Plebian€, Bro. Andres Bonifacio was born inTondo, Manila,  on November 30, 1863 and was assassinated at Maragondon, Cavite on May 10, 1897. Bonifacio joined Freemasonry in 1892 at Taliba Lodge No. 165.

       Born of poor parents and orphaned at an early age, he worked to support his younger brothers and sisters and at the same time endeavored to complete his elementarystudies. Despite his limited education, he studiously read books, among them €œNoli Me Tangere€, €œEl Filibusterismo,€ History of the French Revolution and the Holy Bible, books that were banned for reading during those  turbulent times.      

     He founded the Katipunan, the secret society established purposely to gain independence through force of arms and became its Supremo, or Supreme Head.

     He wrote poems, essays and the Decalogue of the Katipunan on €œDuties of the Sons of the People.€ This decalogue espoused  armed struggle for the purpose of gaining independence and culminated in what is now being celebrated as the €œCry of Balintawak€ or Pugad Lawin, depending on one€™s preferred historical marker.

     A man of daring action and courageous spirit with a passionate love for country, he is considered one of the country€™s foremost heroes, some even comparing him to Dr. Jose Rizal.

Source: http://www.glphils.org/famous-masons/fabonifacio.htm

#18 jed

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 01:00 AM

GEN. MANUEL TINO

Lodge named after Bro. Manuel Tinio: Gen. Manuel Tinio No. 167. Guimba, Nueva Ecija



Manuel Tinio y Bundoc (1877–1924) was the youngest General of the Philippine Revolutionary Army and in 1907, elected Governor of the Province of Nueva Ecija, Republic of the Philippines.

Manuel Tinio, together with his fellow Freemasons (most of the revolucionarios were members of that Brotherhood), spearheaded the establishment of the first Masonic Lodge in Nueva Ecija at Cabanatuan City, which is now named after him.

He was also a pioneering businessman aside from being an hacendero. Having first-hand knowledge of the severe labor shortage that came about due to the widespread conversion of jungles into vast rice farms from 1903–1920, he and his fellow hacenderos established the Samahang Magsasaka in 1910. The Samahan imported and operated the first rice thresher in the country. This was a gargantuan machine run by a wood-fired steam engine and was many times bigger than the huge trilladoras popular during the 50s and 60s. Eventually, the company went on to provide electricity to Cabanatuan City, and continues to do so today.

He also founded in 1911, one of the first soft drink companies in the country. The Marilao Mineral Water Co. had a bottling plant located beside a spring in Marilao, Bulacan who later became Coca-Cola.

The widespread conversion of forests into ricelands during the fist two decades of the 20th century produced abundant surpluses of grain. By the 2nd decade, Nueva Ecija had superseded Pangasinan as the rice granary of Luzon, and Cabanatuan was on its way to becoming the gathering and distribution center of rice for Central Luzon. Numerous rice mills mushroomed all over the capital. Manuel Tinio established one of the first and biggest ricemills in Cabanatuan. In those days, owning a ricemill was like owning a bank. The palay or unhusked rice deposited in the mill could be traded several times over until the owner finally retrieved his stock, the mill owner already having made a profit on every transaction.

Nueva Ecija was the main source of livestock and meat for Manila throughout the 19th century until WW II.

It came as no surprise, therefore, when Gen. Tinio established a cattle ranch in the foothills of Pantabangan.

When he died, he left over 2,200 heads of cattle to his children.

On January 1924, Manuel Tinio was confined in a Manila hospital for cirrhosis of the liver. So greatly regarded was he by everyone that Manuel Quezon, upon hearing that Gen. Tinio was gravely ill, Pres. Emilio Aguinaldo immediately rushed to the hospital, clad only in his pajamas! He died at the age of 47 on Feb. 22, 1924, leaving a widow and 12 children.

Due to his services to the nation, the insular government engaged a special train to carry his coffin to Cabanatuan. The funeral train stopped at every station along the way, so that the officials of each town could conduct necrological services for him. Gen. Manuel Tinio was finally buried in Cabanatuan on March 2, 1924. Gen. Aguinaldo and other surviving revolutionary generals, Quezon, Osmeña and other government dignitaries were there to pay their respects to this remarkable, honorable man.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Tinio

Additional information: Gen Tinio is the father of Judge Mariano Tinio - Past Grand Master of GLP 1967

#19 jed

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 01:09 AM

GRACIANO LOPEZ. JAENA

Lodge named after Bro. Graciano Lopez Jaena: Graciano Lopez Jaena No. 194



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Born in Jaro, Iloilo in the Southern Philippines on December 18,  1856, Bro. Lopez Jaena died on January 20, 1896 in Barcelona Spain.

After circulating satirical novelettes against the Spaniards, he left for Spain in 1879 to evade arrest. He is considered the greatest and most fiery Filipino orator in Spain who denounced in stirring oratory the abuses of the authorities in his native land.

A gifted writer, he founded La Solidaridad, the propaganda mouthpiece for the reform of his native country. He was offered editorship of a newspaper  in New York but he refused saying: “my pen and my intellect belong to the Philippines and not to any foreign country.”

He was made a Mason at Logia Povernir No. 2, becoming its Worshipful Master and later co-founded Logia Solidaridad   53 in Madrid. He is among the first Filipinos to be crowned a 33° Mason in a foreign land.

A brilliant and dedicated Mason he lives enshrined in the hearts of his countrymen whose ideals espoused the phrase “the sword is not as mighty as the pen.”

Source: http://www.glphils.org/famous-masons/flopez.htm

#20 Admin

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 12:32 PM

Tol, taga graciano lopez jaena st. kami nakatira sa jaro, iloilo. yung dulo ng street na yun ancestral house ng bayaning brod. however wala na yung bahay na bato. historical marker nalang ang natira.

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 12:37 PM

RAFAEL PALMA
The tough Rizalist...



Of the legend named Rafael Palma, historian Agoncillo has this to say:  

His reputation rests on his integrity, scholarship, tolerance of unpopular thoughts, and on the growth of the liberal tradition in the University. He stood his ground when he thought he was right and fought like a wounded animal when confronted by forces he thought were inimical to the university and the country. He was one university president who never trembled in the presence of economic overlords, the powerful ecclesiastics, the wealthy, and the politically puissant. Yet his demeanor, with a baldhead, a baby face, and a toothless smile, covered the toughness of mind that characterized him as writer and thinker.

Toughness of mind as student, writer, lawyer, educator, thinker, statesman, and so on! This appears to be the dominant trait that the boy born in Tondo on October 24,1874 was to develop in the process of finding a niche for himself. It was this toughness of mind that he manifested in acquiring education in a Tondo public school, in Ateneo, and especially in UST, where he took up Law. It was this mental toughness, together with his confidence in his fluency in Spanish, that impelled him to join Antonio Luna's La Independencia, the official newspaper of the Revolution, adopting the pen name Dapit Hapon, which became a byword in Spanish-speaking homes. It was this same tough, as well as persistent, mental set that spurred him, after La Independencia's demise, to join El Nuevo Dia, the newspaper published in Cebu by his bosom friend, Sergio Osmeña, with whom he continued the fight for freedom under the American regime. The paper's nationalistic stand, however, made the Americans to pressure the publisher and the staff and to cause its eventual closure. But the mentally tough journalist, Palma, pursued his vision of freedom and joined another nationalistic daily, El Renacimiento. It was during his stint with this paper that he, having met the publisher's daughter, decided, if the platitude is pardonable, to "give up his freedom" for her. Ending his newspapering, he diverted his dedication to law practice.

Again his mental toughness, together with his integrity and scholarship, was responsible, for his success in lawyering. His fame as a lawyer spread rapidly. Thus, when he ran for Assemblyman of Cavite, he won over his rival with little difficulty. His victory enabled him to show his statesmanship, which his erstwhile colleague, Sergio Osmeña, took ready cognizance of. The two became closer friends than before. Another political stalwart, Manuel L. Quezon would later join them and the three would make up the triumvirate that worked for the absolute independence of the Philippines. Palma was later elevated to the Philippine Commission, which was considered the upper chamber of the legislative body at that time. Much later, he was appointed Secretary of Public Instruction.


In 1916, with the enactment of the Jones Law, Palma filed his candidacy for the fourth senatorial district comprising the City of Manila, Laguna, Rizal, and Bataan. Again, he won easily over his pro-American rival, Gregorio Araneta. Belonging to the minority, however, he did not find his political life smooth-a-sailing. His disillusionment with politics caused him to give it up in 1922 and to revert to the practice of Law. Then, in 1923, he was appointed acting president of the University of the Philippines and remained president until 1933 when Quezon's threatened to cut the University's appropriation due to Palma's championing of the Hare-Hawes-Cutting Law. Rather than endanger the existence of the University, he resigned from the presidency.

He ran once more for the Senate, but another political stalwart, Juan Sumulong defeated him. Nursing his defeat, he turned once more to the practice of Law. Later, Quezon appointed him Chairman of the National Board of Education.

Palma was initiated in Bagong Buhay Lodge No. 17 in 1907 and was passed and raised in the same Lodge in 1908. Later, he affiliated with Sinukuan Lodge No.16, where in 1914-15, he became the Master.

In the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Palma was a member of Lakandula Lodge of Perfection, Wise Master of the Chapter of Rose Croix, Manila (1919), a member of Malcampo Council, Knight of Kadosh, and member of Rizal Consistory.  He was elected Knight Commander of the Court of Honor in October 1921 - about a year after his term as Grand Master of Masons in the Philippines.


Palma delighted and inspired his brother Masons with a large number of articles and messages. On January 30, 1931, for example, as Grand Orator, he delivered a lengthy but moving message, in which he showed mainly the place of Masonry in the world of ideas. He said, in part, the following:

The philosophy of Masonry has not lost faith in the goodness of human nature and considers liberty as an inestimable boon and every man's birthright. It consequently endeavors to inculcate the doctrine that man must be educated to be free and to seek to know himself and develop his innate faculties and inclinations. This education involves the free exercise of reason, not only to think and reason for himself, untrammelled by readymade dogma or opinions consecrated by tradition or usage; but to follow a rule of conduct which he considers the most in accordance with prudence and wisdom, through it be in conflict with that which is generally accepted and approved.  Reason is the noblest gift to man...It is the right nay, the duty of each and everyone of us to make our contribution be it ever so small, to the progress of the world, and it is not by waiving the free use of reason that we can add our grain of sand to that building, but by contributing a new thought, a new idea, a new mode of procedure or new rule of conduct. He who contents himself with taking all he needs from the accumulated wisdom of the ages without giving anything in return is a spendthrift, not a collaborator.

One can readily see from this quotation that even as Mason (or it is especially as Mason?). Palma advocated mental and volitional toughness, urging his Brethren to think for themselves and not to accept without discussion whatever had been taught, to contribute to the accumulated wisdom of the ages and therefore to the progress of mankind. Such a philosophy, he maintained in his writings, especially in his prize-winning biography of Jose Rizal, which has been considered to be the best, most compendious, and most faithful portrayal of the Filipino hero's life and character.   In this biography, Palma was Rizal's "collaborator," as he himself put it. Translated later into English by Justice Roman Ozaeta with the title "The Pride of the Malay Race," the biography stirred the hornet's nest and was banned as a reading material. In a sense, Palma, analytically presenting Rizal's life and ideas, contributed a new thought, a new idea, and new mode of procedure.

A scholar par excellence, Palma was advanced in his ideas. He believed that, despite our imperfections, we should attain a degree of perfection, i.e., find the selves we were meant to be, and that this quest or search should start with an open and a tough mind. Listen to him once more:

Human life could not be better symbolized than by the Masonic pavement which covers the floor of our temples and is emblematic of how checkered our existence is with good and evil, grief and joy, suffering and happiness. The work of the Mason cannot be symbolized better than by the construction of a temple which was never finished, because whatever may be our wisdom and degree of skill, and however charitable our feelings may be towards our Brethren and fellows, we never attain perfection. The temple, which we are building, is ourselves. The materials, which we have to polish, adjust, and fit into place are passions and vices. There are, unfortunately, too many racial, religious, and political prejudices, which blind the intellect and prevent the heart from recognizing the truth, cementing brotherly love, and relieving distress. We have to rid ourselves of these prejudices. Masonry demands of each individual an open mind, quick sympathy, and disinterested charity, because only with these quoins and ashlars is it possible for us to construct the temple dedicated to the Fatherhood of God and the Brotherhood of Man which are the strength and secret of our union.

The symbolic temple that Palma constructed became a shining monument to those who were in the dark at that time - and has become that to those who, up to today, although in another form, have continued to cling on to some kind of racial, religious, and political prejudices.

Palma lived a rich, full life - a life dedicated to the search for the truth, to the fearless articulation of the discovered truth aimed at liberating the minds of men from the bondage and shackles of ignorance, and to the pursuit, not of things mundane, but of what was thought to be the ideal or the bonum verum. Having lived such a life, Palma has become a part of history. Teodoro Agoncillo writes this of him:

"Palma's last moments were painful. Bed-ridden, he had lost his sense of hearing and taste and his eyesight failing. He could hardly recognize even his friends. It is said that when a boyhood friend, a priest, visited him, Palma, poorly discerning the visitor, waived him aside and bade him to leave. His end came on May 24, 1939. He lived and died a poor man, never changing his simple lifestyle and never surrendering his freedom of thought and conscience. Up to the end, he remained a Mason. But he was a Mason who accompanied his wife to church, for he believed that religion was, and is, a deeply personal matter and should never be interfered with. Above all, Palma gave the University of the Philippines academic pride, freedom and decency. "

Yes, the Tondo-born boy developed into a multifaceted personality - a scholarly student; a steadfastly nationalistic journalist, a refined, accomplished statesman; an uprightly honest lawyer; a "proud academic administrator; a respecter and practitioner of the freedom of thought, conscience, and religion; a spiritual-temple builder; a dedicated Mason and respected Grand Master of Masons in 1920; and a consistently poor rich man. That poor rich man has given the Masonic fraternity a sense of pride. Thus, even in death, Palma speaks to his Brethren, inspiring them to attain the palm of victory. (SPF)


Rafael Palma Lodge #147
(aka the UP Lodge)

Stated meeting every third Saturday of the month, 2 pm at Capitol Masonic Temple, Matalino st. QC

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#22 Barney

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 03:06 PM

Dr. Jose P. Rizal

Dr. Jose P. Rizal, a Philippine national born on June 19, 1861, died before a firing squad on December 30, 1896. Thus came to an inglorious end the life of a remarkable man and Mason. Martyr, patriot, poet, novelist, physician, Mason—he was all of these and more. In fact, he squeezed into a very few years, 35, an incredible array of activities. Further, he traveled extensively and affected profoundly lives far removed from his native land. As is often the case with great men, controversy surrounded his life and continues to surface today. In this article for the Journal, I am pleased to comment on a biography of Bro. Rizal by Reynold S. Fajardo. Titled Dimasalang: The Masonic Life of Dr. Jose Rizal, this book will be more thoroughly reviewed and excerpted from in a future issue of Heredom, the transactions of the Scottish Rite Research Society.

The Sovereign Grand Commander of the Philippine Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite, Ill. Rudyardo V. Bunda, 33°, writes in the preface to Dimasalang: "Most Filipinos know that Rizal was a Mason, but very few are familiar with the extent of his involvement in the Fraternity." The Grand Commander goes on to note that his Supreme Council "considers this book as a meaningful contribution to the scholarship on Rizal and is proud to publish it as its share in the commemoration of the Centennial [1996] of Rizal’s martyrdom."

The 1800s were tumultuous years for the Spanish monarchy. Napoleon had invaded the Iberian Peninsula earlier in the century taking the royal family into exile and installing a puppet on the throne. Revolution had racked her western hemisphere possessions, and Spain lost all of them, except Cuba and Puerto Rico, by the end of 1824. Then she lost Cuba and Puerto Rico in 1898. The economic life of Spain and her empire had been little changed by the industrial revolution. Intellectually, a sterility existed and did not change significantly until the Generation of 1898 writers and thinkers appeared.

Also, scandal tore at the very heart of the homeland when Generals Prim and Serrano removed Queen Isabel II from the throne for, among other things, gross immorality. They provided a military junta arrangement until the monarchy could be reestablished under more capable hands.

The 19th century produced volatility at home and abroad. Cuba experienced a ten-year civil war in the middle part of the century. Cuban expatriates as well as non-Cuban adventurers sought to wrest the island from the control of what they considered a fossilized monarchy and an absolutist church. Their efforts intensified in 1895 when José Martí returned to the island, losing his life but setting off a current of events which ultimately included an invasion by the United States and which resulted in Cuban independence. The Philippine Islands shared much in common with Cuba during the 19th century. It was in this environment that Jose Rizal made his appearance in 1861.

The Philippine hero was born to affluent parents in Calamba. He showed early academic promise and eventually obtained a licentiate in medicine specializing in ophthalmology. Few Masonic Lodges existed in the Philippines during Rizal’s adolescence, and Lodge membership consisted primarily of European Spaniards with only a sprinkling of Philippine nationals. Rizal’s uncle, Jose Alberto Alonzo, a Knight Commander of the Spanish Orders of Isabel the Catholic and Carlos III, had joined the Masonic Fraternity, possibly in Spain, certainly in Manila. Rizal lived in his uncle’s home during part of his student days. Whether his uncle exercised a Masonic influence on Rizal is not clear; what is certain is that Rizal acquired a lasting positive memory of Masonry which was enhanced when he visited Naples in 1882. There he saw a multitude of posters and signs announcing the death of the great Italian patriot Giuseppe Garibaldi, a 33° Scottish Rite Mason who had served as Grand Master. This impressed Rizal greatly for he wrote about this Masonic encounter in a letter to his family.

In Spain the young and highly impressionable Rizal encountered an intellectual environment with far fewer restraints than the one in his native land. Here he came under the influence of a host of outstanding thinkers, many of them Freemasons. For example, Grand Master Miguel Morayta helped to expand Rizal’s historical mind-set, and ex-President Francisco Pi y Margal exerted a profound influence on Rizal’s political evolution. Further, these republican liberals were staunch advocates of Philippine independence. Not surprisingly, Rizal petitioned Acacia Lodge No. 9, Gran Oriente de España, the very Lodge in which Morayta and Pi y Margal held membership. When initiated, Rizal selected Dimasalang as his symbolic name within the Craft, a custom prevalent at the time among Spanish Masons.

Rizal quickly became involved in Filipino expatriate circles in Spain and revealed a remarkable ability to write both poetry and prose. He soon commenced work on his famous novel Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not). In this seminal work, Rizal dissected the Philippine colonial government and placed particular blame for its repressive nature on certain religious elements. Rizal was convinced that conditions in the Philippines existed not because of Spain or the Catholic Church but because of the practices of certain regular clergy, namely Dominicans and Recollects. Spanish newspapers ran stories about the exciting Philippine firebrand, stories which soon made their way to Manila. There, government and religious authorities immediately took note and did not hesitate to label Rizal a subversive.

Bro. Rizal departed Spain in July 1885 to further his ophthalmology studies in France and Germany. For the next two years, he met and associated with the leading minds of Paris, Leipzig, Berlin, and Heidelberg. It was a heady atmosphere for the young Brother, and Masons in Germany, Dr. Rudolf Virchow and Dr. Feodor Jagor, were instrumental in his becoming a member of the Berlin Ethnological and Anthropological Societies. While in Germany, Rizal acquired additional Masonic Degrees.

When his novel Noli Me Tangere, came off the press in Europe, Rizal sent copies to, among others, the Governor-General of the Philippines and the Archbishop of Manila. The Governor-General, Emilio Terrero y Perinat, a 33° Mason, represented no problem, and he protected Rizal upon his return to the islands and for as long as he held the Governor-Generalship. The Archbishop, however, presented a problem which did not go away. Rizal had become increasingly convinced of his need to campaign in person for reform in the Philippines as opposed to propagandizing from afar. His friends cautioned him not to return but failed to dissuade the idealist. On August 5, 1887, Dr. Rizal stepped ashore in Manila.

Almost immediately, serious problems emerged. The Manila Archbishop put pressure on Governor-General Terrero to ban Rizal’s book. Terrero, who had a real liking for Rizal, hesitated to suppress the book which rapidly circulated in the capital. The church authorities did not delay in publishing a condemnation of the work, but, to their chagrin, the condemnation only enhanced sales. Rizal also involved himself in a sticky matter which concerned a Dominican hacienda in Calamba. According to critics of the Dominicans, their hacienda holdings were excessive, and the friars had not paid their fair share of taxes. Rizal, when requested by the town council of Calamba, got involved in an investigation of the matter, and his report during a public meeting was highly critical of the Dominicans.

The church hierarchy did not take long to react. The Archbishop increased pressure on the Governor-General to suppress Noli Me Tangere as an inflammatory book and to arrest its author. Accordingly, Governor-General Terrero, fearing he might not be able to protect him, put pressure on Rizal to depart the country. Rizal heeded the advice and traveled to Hong Kong. Meanwhile, the religious authorities carried out reprisals against Rizal’s family which included the arrest of his mother.

After a short stay in Hong Kong, Rizal traveled to Japan and then the United States where he enjoyed the experience of a coast-to-coast visit. New York, in particular, impressed him, and cryptic evidence in his diary suggests he may have visited the Grand Lodge of New York. From New York City, Rizal journeyed to England and then on to the continent. While in Paris, Rizal published, with annotations, Antonio de Morga’s Sucesos de las Islas Filipinas (Events in the Philippine Islands). Financial pressure forced him to relocate from Paris to Belgium. There, he worked hard on his second novel, El Filibusterismo (The Subversives), in which he sounded clearly the tocsin for Philippine revolution.

During a visit to Spain, Dr. Rizal affiliated with an all-Filipino Masonic Lodge, Solidaridad (Solidarity) No. 53. At their annual communication, the Brethren elected him to a minor office, Supervising Architect. Before his departure from Spain, the Gran Oriente Español designated Rizal as its Grand Representative with authority to represent the Body in France and Germany. This was a distinct honor, for Rizal apparently had never served as Worshipful Master of a constituent Lodge.

Rizal’s El Filibusterismo was published in September 1891, and in October he departed for Hong Kong. There he enjoyed a delightful reunion with family members. He wanted to return to Manila but desisted in view of the controversy his books had generated, especially his second, El Filibusterismo. While in Hong Kong, Rizal developed an extensive and lucrative medical practice. Meanwhile, a Lodge for Filipinos, Nilad No. 144, had been established in Manila. The Lodge membership honored Rizal in absentia by electing him "Honorable Venerable Master" and had the Secretary inform him by letter of his preferment. Soon after formation of Nilad Lodge, Masonic growth in the Philippines mushroomed, and when Rizal returned in 1892, Masonry was well established.

The Filipino Masons seized every opportunity to honor Rizal after his return, and the Spanish authorities, in turn, monitored his every movement. Worried about revolution, the authorities, constantly encouraged by Rizal’s enemies among the friars, had him arrested and deported to Dapitan on July 6, 1892. Further, the authorities began to close Lodges and deport active Masons.

The Jesuits made a determined effort to influence Rizal in his Dapitan exile, even enlisting former college professors. Their effort failed. Rizal enjoyed family visits in Dapitan, and friends of his sought to arrange a flight to safety. Rizal, however, did not want to embrace the safety net of a fugitive. When José Martí and his compatriots launched the Cuban Revolution in 1895, Dr. Rizal offered his services to the Governor-General as a volunteer physician. Governor-General Blanco seized the opportunity to send Rizal out of the country and, hopefully, save his life. In fact, Blanco wrote to cabinet ministers in Spain requesting the Spanish government to pardon Rizal. When Rizal departed for Spain, he was unaware of the doom which awaited him. When Rizal’s ship reached Spain, the authorities returned him to the Philippines to stand trial for treason, and he was executed on December 30, 1896. The story however does not end there. The subsequent Philippine Revolution proved successful and removed European Spaniards from all positions of authority. The scales of justice not only righted but tipped in favor of such revolutionaries as Bro. Jose Rizal. Recognized as the "George Washington of the Philippines," Bro. Rizal endures today as a national and Masonic hero.

source: http://www.drjoseprizal270.org/apps/blog/s...f-dr-jose-rizal
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#23 Admin

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 06:50 PM

Barney, na raise ka na ba?

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#24 Admin

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 06:53 PM

QUOTE (Buknoy @ Oct 6 2010, 03:58 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Macario R. Ramos, Sr.
Founding Grand Master
Supreme Council, Order of DeMolay
Republic of the Philippines


MACARIO R. RAMOS MEMORIAL LODGE NO. 355

The Lodge is named in honor of the First Grand Master of the Supreme Council Order of Demolay, Republic of the Philippines. A noted insuranceman. A world war II veteran with the Rank of Colonel, a Survivor of the death march from Bataan to Capas, Tarlac and a very much well-loved by the youth, whose unselfish contributions to Masonry, the Brethren felt should be recognized.

          On May 24, 2003 Thirty Three Master Masons addressed a petition to the MW Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the Philippines, praying for a permission to organize a Lodge at the Scottish Rite Temple, in Taft Avenue, Malate Manila, to be named “Dad Macario R. Ramos Sr. Memorial Lodge “UD”.

          The petition was favorably endorsed by Very Worshipful Ramoncito P. Javier District Deputy Grand Master of Masonic District No. 1 and worshipful Brother Jose A. Roncesvalles- Worshipful Master of Cosmos Lodge No. 8

          Most Worshipful Napoleon A. Soriano, PGM with the authority of Most Worshipful Ricardo G. Galvez, Grand Master. With the assistance of RW Jaime Y. Gonzales – Junior Grand Warden who acted as Master of Ceremonies instituted Dad Macario R. Ramos Sr. Memorial Lodge UD., on February 20. 2004 and on the same day the officers of the Lodge were installed into office, the Lodge had no problem securing a Charter from the MW Grand Lodge, during the Annual Communication held in April 2005 at the Tagaytay Convention Center, Tagaytay City.

          On May 2, 2005, Most Worshipful Hermogenes E. Ebdane Jr., Grand Master together with his Grand Line Officers, personally Constituted Macario R. Ramos Memorial Lodge No. 355, F. & A.M., at the Scottish Rite Temple, 1828 Taft Avenue, Malate, Manila.

          With Worshipful Brother Reynaldo M. Tomampo as the Worshipful Master Bro. Charles G. Agar as the Senior Warden and Bro. Januario E. Sia-Cunco, as the Junior Warden.

         Today Macario R. Ramos Memorial No. 355, F. & A.M., is hailed as one of the Most Dynamic and Active Lodge of Masonic NCR-A Thanks to the dedication of its members.



----

Source: http://mrrml355.blogspot.com/

----

Buknoy's Note:  I had the honor and the privilege of personally knowing Dad Mac Ramos before he dropped his working tools back in the 90's.  He is one great man, truly a lover of the DeMolay movement.


Buk, maraming senior demolay-masons sa macario lodge?

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#25 MRMT

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 07:09 PM

General Manuel Tinio

General Manuel Tinio Lodge #167


The Tinio family, whose most illustrious son is Manuel Tinio, is the largest and is conceivably the most prominent and wealthiest family in the province of Nueva Ecija. Too, the family is the largest landowner[2] in the whole of Central Luzon, if not the entire Philippines, prior to the declaration of Martial Law.

The Tinios, like the Rizals, are of Chinese descent. An archival document from San Fernando, Pampanga dated 1745 describes a certain Domingo Tinio as a Chino Cristiano or baptized Chinese.

Juan Tinio[3], the first ancestor on record had twin sons who were baptized in Gapan in 1750. In the baptismal record he is described as an indio natural, a native Filipino. From this it can be deduced that either his grandfather or an earlier ancestor was a pure-blooded Chinese. (Juan Tinio became the first middleman of the Tobacco Monopoly when it was established in 1782 and held the position for two years.)

Juan Tinio's great-grandson, Mariano Tinio Santiago, was the father of Manuel Tinio. Mariano and his siblings, originally born Santiago, changed their family name to Tinio, their mother's family name, in accordance with Gov.-Gen. Narciso Claveria's second decree of 1850 requiring all Indios and Chinese mestizos to change their family names if these were saints’ names. Although he was a native of San Isidro, Nueva Ecija, Mariano eventually settled in Licab, then a barrio of Aliaga beside Lake Canarem, and carved out rice fields from the heavily forested area. Having served as Cabeza de Barangay of the place, he came to be known as ‘Cabezang Marianong Pulang Buhok’ (Cabezang Mariano Red Haired). Although he eventually became a big landowner, he lived very simply on his lands. Mariano was a man of strong principles, and even led a petition to the Governor-General denouncing the corruption and abuses of the Alcalde Mayor, the governor of Nueva Ecija, and asking for his recall. Cabesang Mariano married several times and, in the fashion of the time, engaged in extramarital affairs, siring numerous progeny. His fourth and last wife was Silveria Misadsad Bundoc of Entablado, Cabiao. He died on Oct.11, 1889 in Licab. Silveria, a woman of very strong character, lived on until the 2" decade of the 20th century.

Manuel Tinio was born to Silveria on June 17, 1877 in Licab, a barrio of Aliaga that became an independent municipality in 1890. He was the only son and had two sisters, the eldest, Maximiana, married Valentin de Castro of Licab and Catalina, the youngest, married Clemente Gatchalian Hernandez of Malolos, Bulacan. Manuel was his mother's favorite, his father having died when Manuel was twelve.
[edit] Early years

The young Manuel Tinio learned his caton, the phonetic ABCs, under an unknown tutor in Licab. Later, he went to the provincial capital where he attended a school in Calaba, San Isidro headed by Don Rufino Villaruz. He continued his studies in Manila in the school run by Don V. Crisologo. In 1893 he entered San Juan de Letran, where he pursued his segunda ensenianza or high school studies until 1896.

Manuel Tinio was said to have been a mischievous student, but a born leader. As was the custom of the time, the students tended to gravitate into regional groups. Naturally, Manuel became the leader of the Novo-Ecijanos. He and his friends pulled a prank, which cost him his graduation. The teenaged Manuel Tinio and his "barkada" had just come from an arnis de mano match in the Jardin Botanico (behind the present-day Metropolitan Theater) and were on their way back to Intramuros when they saw a Spaniard bicycling towards them. Dared by his friends, Manuel pushed the cyclist and everyone ran away in glee as soon as the man fell. The furious Spaniard, who turned out to be an officer of the Guardia Civil, recognized Manuel. That night, several civil guards came knocking at the boarding house where Manuel was staying. Tinio and his fellow boarders, wondering at the commotion, peeped through a hole on the floor and saw the soldiers. Realizing that he was going to be arrested Manuel jumped out of a window for his dear life and fled to Licab, his hometown. This was the first of many such narrow escapes in his remarkable life.

Manuel Tinio, together with his fellow Freemasons (most of the revolucionarios were members of that Brotherhood), spearheaded the establishment of the first Masonic Lodge in Nueva Ecija at Cabanatuan City, which is now named after him.

He was also a pioneering businessman aside from being an hacendero. Having first-hand knowledge of the severe labor shortage that came about due to the widespread conversion of jungles into vast rice farms from 1903–1920, he and his fellow hacenderos established the Samahang Magsasaka in 1910. The Samahan imported and operated the first rice thresher in the country. This was a gargantuan machine run by a wood-fired steam engine and was many times bigger than the huge trilladoras popular during the 50s and 60s. Eventually, the company went on to provide electricity to Cabanatuan City, and continues to do so today.

He also founded in 1911, one of the first soft drink companies in the country. The Marilao Mineral Water Co. had a bottling plant located beside a spring in Marilao, Bulacan who later became Coca-Cola.

The widespread conversion of forests into ricelands during the fist two decades of the 20th century produced abundant surpluses of grain. By the 2nd decade, Nueva Ecija had superseded Pangasinan as the rice granary of Luzon, and Cabanatuan was on its way to becoming the gathering and distribution center of rice for Central Luzon. Numerous rice mills mushroomed all over the capital. Manuel Tinio established one of the first and biggest ricemills in Cabanatuan. In those days, owning a ricemill was like owning a bank. The palay or unhusked rice deposited in the mill could be traded several times over until the owner finally retrieved his stock, the mill owner already having made a profit on every transaction.

Nueva Ecija was the main source of livestock and meat for Manila throughout the 19th century until WW II.

It came as no surprise, therefore, when Gen. Tinio established a cattle ranch in the foothills of Pantabangan.

When he died, he left over 2,200 heads of cattle to his children.

On January 1924, Manuel Tinio was confined in a Manila hospital for cirrhosis of the liver. So greatly regarded was he by everyone that Manuel Quezon, upon hearing that Gen. Tinio was gravely ill, Pres. Emilio Aguinaldo immediately rushed to the hospital, clad only in his pajamas! He died at the age of 47 on Feb. 22, 1924, leaving a widow and 12 children.

Due to his services to the nation, the insular government engaged a special train to carry his coffin to Cabanatuan. The funeral train stopped at every station along the way, so that the officials of each town could conduct necrological services for him. Gen. Manuel Tinio was finally buried in Cabanatuan on March 2, 1924. Gen. Aguinaldo and other surviving revolutionary generals, Quezon, Osmeña and other government dignitaries were there to pay their respects to this remarkable, honorable man.

#26 Buknoy

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 08:27 PM

@Admin - Not that many tolskie as far as I know.  Senior DeMolays have been knocking all over the place.  Hindi lang sila sa iisang lohiya kumakatok, at least for NCR.  But still, many of them decide to knock at JDML#305.
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#27 Admin

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 11:15 PM

mas marami bang senior demolays sa JDML kesa sa Escudo? wala bang parang friendly alliance of demolay related lodges?

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#28 Buknoy

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 11:35 PM

Historically, mas madami pa din yata sa JDML, although madami din sa Escudo.  Matagal na ang JDML compared to Escudo kaya mas madami pa din siguro ang sa JDML.  

With regard to friendly alliance, medyo hindi masyadong interesado ang DeMolays dito bro dahil alliances can be misconstrued as "political alliances" by non-DeMolays and may be thought of as a movement to catapult a DeMolay to the Grand Oriental Chair.  Naging usap-usapan na minsan yan when MW Boy Aniag was elected JGW na bumubuo daw ng faction ang mga DeMolay.  Kung may alliances man, hindi ito gagawing obvious. smile.gif
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#29 Admin

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 11:40 PM

gusto ko kasi macatapult sa electric chair yung kaibigan kong demolay-mason. kilala mo siguro sia sa nickname na aybanhoe the terribol.

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#30 Buknoy

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 12:01 AM

Ahhh, kupal yun tol.
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